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Alone Against the Dark
Publisher: Chaosium
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 12/02/2021 22:24:15

I really like this solo adventure a lot. Prior to this, my only other solo CoC experience was Alone Against the Flames, which is a much shorter and more basic module. Alone Against the Dark, on the other hand, actually feels like a full campaign experience. There's globe-trotting, there's an ancient conspiracy, there's a nefarious cult, and there's an ancient artifact that everyone is trying to get their hands on. In other words, it has all the trappings of a classic CoC adventure. The story is definitely a bit on the lighter, pulpier side of CoC, but I think that it works for this kind of experience and there is still plenty of horror and mind-being insanity here.

I was surprised by how well the gameplay works as a solo experience and how much it really does remind me of playing CoC with friends. Obviously it's not as good as sitting around the table with other human beings, but if you're a forever GM like me, it's a good way of getting a taste of that player experience. And I was surprised by the amount and depth of the content here. This is a pretty substantial adventure and will take you several sittings to get through.

I do wish that certain sections of this adventure were handled a bit better. Without going into spoilers, there were several moments in the campaign that I was really looking forward to, only to find that the way that this book handled them was a bit anti-climactic. The module also has a tendency to take control out of the player's hands and not allow you to make rolls during some moments where it really feels like you should be allowed to make one. Usually this is done to move the plot forward, but it can feel a bit cheap sometimes. But in a solo adventure like this, that sort of feeling is kind of inevitable.

But there are plenty of unexpected twists, turns, and surprises to be had here and I really enjoyed my time with Alone Against the Dark overall. Like any good CoC scenario it can be very lethal, you usually have the ability to keep playing as a different character if your current one dies.

My advice to get the best experience out of this module: Play as the pre-gen characters, put your extra points into skills that you feel that character would concievably have (don't meta-game and just pick the important skills), and use the time-keeping calendar that the game gives you. It might feel kind of lame to have to keep track of every hour of time, but it really does make the experience much more immersive and, in my opinion, fun.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Alone Against the Dark
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Fallout: The Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook PDF
Publisher: Modiphius
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/27/2021 20:59:37

I was a bit skeptical coming into this RPG. The only previous Modiphius 2d20 games I had played were Conan, which I thought was mostly pretty solid, and the Dishonored RPG, which I thought was kind of a mess. I really like the core concept of the 2d20 system, but both Conan and Dishonored had several systems that felt really underdeveloped and poorly explained (doom, chaos, truths, momentum, etc). I’m very happy to say then that the Fallout RPG pretty much fixes every problem I had with these previous games and feels like a fully-realized version of the 2d20 system.

The 2d20 system is simple: for every skill test, you roll 2d20s and try to roll below your skill rating. Every 1 you roll is a crit, which acts as two successes, and every 20 you roll is a complication, which allows the GM to do something really nasty to your character. Both the players and the GM have a resource called action points (AP) that they can use to, among other things, add more d20s to their pool when they make a roll. This replaces the more confusing meta-resources that the other games had with something much simpler and easier to comprehend, but you still get the fun head-to-head metagame of the players and the GM trying to use their AP against each other as strategically as possible.

The combat system is really good here too, with just the right amount of complexity. Combat uses the normal 2d20 rolls to determine if you hit, but uses D6s to determine damage. The book really wants you to order Modiphius’ fancy custom Fallout dice (which don’t even exist yet last time I checked), but you really don’t need them; you can just roll normal d6s and consult a table. In combat, you can do things like make called shots, or spend extra ammo to inflict more damage, or spend AP to let you do more actions. There’s a good amount of player agency in the combat without it feeling too overwhelming.

There’s many more player options than I expected. Players can not only be Vault Dwellers or Wasteland Survivors, but also creatures like Ghouls and Super Mutants. You can even play as a Mister Gutsy if you want, which is awesome. You also get to choose a background for your character that determines your starting equipment, so if for example you decide to be a Brotherhood of Steel member, you can start as either ]an initiate or a scribe. Overall, I quite like the way that this game handles character creation, and the way that the designers translated the “tag” system from the video game to the TTRPG is really quite clever.

Lore-wise, this book is mired in the Fallout 4 version of the Fallout universe. It’s a bit of a weird choice considering 4 isn’t exactly universally loved, but I guess it’s better than Fallout 76 being the setting. The book goes into a lot of detail about the Commonwealth setting and factions, but as the GM you can easily move the setting to New California or the Capitol Wasteland or the Mojave if you would prefer. Just be aware that all of the world-building, bestiary, and gameplay inspirations for this book come directly from Fallout 4 and seemingly nowhere else. I find this a bit disappointing but it’s not a huge deal to me, since the setting is probably the one thing that I liked about Fallout 4. I would love a New Vegas sourcebook in the future but since Bethesda doesn’t even like to acknowledge that game’s existence, it’ll probably never happen.

I saw some people complaining that this book doesn’t feel like it has enough information for the GM and that you would probably need another supplement to properly run the game, but I don’t think that’s true at all. After reading through this whole book just once, I feel like I could easily and confidently run a session of this game with no problem, and that’s not something I can say about many RPG core rulebooks. And with a very complete list of items, weapons, and enemies, it feels like there’s enough content here to keep your group playing this game for quite some time.

My one real complaint about the game is that it imports a lot of rules and systems from the video game that just make no sense at all in an RPG. For example, there's a long list of modification for each weapon (all of them straight from the video game), but many of them make no sense in the context of a tabletop game. Why would I ever need to modify my rifle to fire a different caliber of ammo? That mod makes sense in the game, but makes no sense in an RPG. A lot of the time it feels like they just included game mechanics simply because they were in Fallout 4, even if they don’t have any practical use in a TTRPG.

Regardless, this game completely exceeded my expectations on almost every level and is honestly a very impressive and comprehensive take on a Fallout tabletop RPG. I was expecting this to be a rushed, unfinished, messy cash grab but it’s actually anything but, with a wealth of options and a very well-designed gameplay system. Unless you really, really hate Fallout 4 and its setting, I highly recommend this game to any Fallout fan.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Fallout: The Roleplaying Game Core Rulebook PDF
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Delta Green: Music From a Darkened Room
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/27/2021 20:49:50

This was the first Delta Green scenario that I ever played, and it’s what made me fall in love with the game. Now, much later, I’ve finally read the scenario myself. I think this is probably my favorite DG scenario; the premise is so simple and yet it’s so full of horror and mystery. This scenario probably creeped me out more than any other RPG scenario I’ve played, and reading through it recently I still find it very unnerving.

The premise here is simple: the Agents have been tasked with investigating the apparent suicide of a fellow Agent in a house in New Jersey, only to discover that the house has been the site of numerous grisly deaths in the past, all presumed accidents or suicides. Like any good DG scenario, the Agents are given a mysterious handler, a few friendlies to talk to, and a green box to pilfer through. But eventually, they’ll make their way to the house, and that’s when the terror really begins…

A good handler with a real talent for building tension and a creative mind could create something truly horrifying with this scenario. There’s so many potential ways to unnerve and scare your players thanks to the house’s long and sordid history. But I really appreciate the fact that the scenario provides the handler with many possibilities you could use if you’re feeling lazy or uncreative.

I think this is Delta Green’s “rite of passage” scenario, like what The Haunting is for CoC, and if you have a Delta Green group it’s pretty much mandatory that you play this at some point.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: Music From a Darkened Room
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Once Upon a Winter's Eve: a 5th-level Christmas/Holiday One-Shot
Publisher: Dungeon Masters Guild
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/26/2021 14:53:26

I was in the market for Christmas one-shots for my group, so I checked this one out. I didn't exactly love this scenario, but I don't hate it either. I think it's perfectly fine and playable, but I think I'll end up running something else for my group over the holidays.

The scenario is pretty straightforward; the characters wander into a small village in the midst of a blizzard and seek shelter in a tavern. When the storm passes, they find that the residents of the village have been frozen solid and encounter a strange woman dancing amongst the frozen figures. The players learn that they must confront and defeat this magical queen in her icy castle in order to free the villagers. Yeah, the scenario reminds me a lot of a certain Disney movie, but I'm not sure how much of that was intentional by the author. It's definitely not trying to be Frozen fanfic or anything, but everyone at the table is going to be thinking of that movie. I guess it's up to you and your group as to whether that's a good thing or a bad thing.

Along the way, the party will fight a giant aquatic worm, meet some elves, and ride a slay pulled by a dragon. There's some cool moments to be had here, but overall the scenario really just me feeling "meh" about it, and I can't put my finger on exactly why. I guess it's because nothing about the scenario is particularly memorable; the characters are barely described at all and mostly just exist to move the plot forward, there's no crazy magical items or artifacts, and none of the monster fights or other situation feel particularly original.

And I definitely don't get that Christmas or holidays feel from this one-shot. I understand that that was intentional: for some reason, the author really wanted you to be able to do this as a non-Christmas adventure, even though that's pretty much the only time of year most groups would want to run it. I can understand not wanting to be too whimsical or cheesy, but I really think that invoking more Christmas tropes or imagery might have helped this scenario feel a bit more interesting and fun.

This scenario is fine, I don't regret buying it and some groups might absolutely love it. But in my opinion there's much better Christmas one-shots out there.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Once Upon a Winter's Eve: a 5th-level Christmas/Holiday One-Shot
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Claus for Concern: A Holiday One-Shot for Christmas
Publisher: Dungeon Masters Guild
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 11/26/2021 14:33:20

I was really pleasantly surprised by the quality of this scenario. It's your typical "Santa's workshop is attacked by strange creatures and the party must rescue him" Christmas one-shot, but it's really well done and has some really memorable scenes. Some people might find it a little whimsical or cheesy, but I think that kind of tone is perfect for this kind of one-shot, and this would be a great scenario to run for younger kids. I was also pleased to find that there were no typos or formatting issues with the PDF. It uses slightly different formatting than most 5e scenarios, but this really didn't bother me at all and it's perfectly readable. If you want a short, lighthearted one-shot where your players get to rescue Santa and his elves from monsters, I think this fits the bill perfectly.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Claus for Concern: A Holiday One-Shot for Christmas
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The Haunt
Publisher: Dungeon Masters Guild
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/29/2021 23:58:01

This is a pretty solid scenario. I ran it as a Halloween one shot for my group and they quite enjoyed it. The story hooks and setting are ambigious enough that this can easily be inserted into the middle of an existing campaign or just ran as a stand-alone one shot. A mysterious, spooky house is a bit of a cliche for horror-themed DnD scenarios, but this one does the trope really well. The Haunt builds tension well and has plenty of creepy imagery, and the combat encounters are mostly pretty interesting. And while it only really has one puzzle, I think it's a pretty good one, though some groups will no doubt find it fustrating.

Still, for $7 The Haunt feels a bit too short. My players beat it in around 6 hours, but that's including a pretty lengthy intro that I wrote to draw my players into the scenario. It feels like there should be slightly more to the house: a few more rooms on each floor and a handful more story handouts to flesh out General Montharthas' backstory a little more.

But overall I reccomend The Haunt. If you're looking for a horror themed one shot that doesn't require a ton of prep time, this is a really good choice.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Haunt
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Dead Light and Other Dark Tales
Publisher: Chaosium
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/27/2021 01:08:22

Dead Light contains two very interesting scenarios for CoC. They could both be run as standalone one shots, but are really intended to be inserted into an existing campaign at a moment when your players are driving through the deep, dark woods around Arkham.

Dead Light is one of the most lethal CoC scenarios that I’ve read, and I’ve read a lot of them. It’s kind of ironic that this is meant to be inserted into an existing campaign because if you run it as intended it’ll probably kill at least half of your players. Dead Light is essentially one of those scenarios that traps the investigators in a desperate situation, facing down a horrific foe with no means of escape. But it also does a really fantastic job of building suspense and atmosphere before the monster first appears. I think many groups might have a hard time figuring out how to actually defeat the monster in this scenario, and as the Keeper you may have to show a bit of mercy on them unless you want a TPK.

Saturnine Chalice is also really interesting; it’s a scenario that is based almost entirely around social interaction and puzzle solving, with little to no combat. Usually puzzle-based scenarios like this end up being a bit dull, but the writers found some really clever ways of keeping this one feeling tense and horrific. This scenario takes place in a large manor house in the middle of the woods and your players are going to have a lot of fun figuring out what is really going on with the strange people that live there. Well-designed puzzles and plenty of insanity-inducing sights and revelations make this a really memorable scenario, though it’s obviously not for every group.

There’s also some included “scenario prompts”. These are ok, ranging from somewhat clever to very predictable, but they’re not really the reason why you’re buying the book. $8 feels maybe a bit steep for two short scenarios, but they’re both really written and memorable so I think this book is definitely worth the purchase if you have a CoC group.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Dead Light and Other Dark Tales
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Delta Green: A Victim of the Art
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/19/2021 15:32:35

Overall I like this scenario, but I have a bit of an issue with it. I like the fact that it gives your players the opportunity to carry out a good old fashioned murder investigation and piece together the clues to the killer’s identity themselves through some clever detective work. And even once your players figure out who the killer is, the supernatural element will still probably take them by surprise.

But my big problem with this scenario is that it’s really only half written. The authors basically just give you the first half of the story and then say “figure out the rest for yourself”. Sure, I can take the time to write some things that could happen, but that kind of defeats the purpose of buying a pre-written adventure. This kind of feels more like a shotgun scenario than a full module.

I’d still recommend this one though, just be aware that you’ll basically have to write part of the adventure yourself.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: A Victim of the Art
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Delta Green: The Last Equation
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/16/2021 01:55:48

This is one my new favorite DG scenarios. If you have a group that's heavily into roleplaying, you're going to have a blast running this game. Even if your group isn't as into that sort of thing, there's still a lot of fun to be had here. There's a lot of really well written NPCs that add some layers of complexity to the story, but you could leave any of them out if you want to keep things simple. It's also a pretty good scenario for newer players and/or handlers, since the events are pretty straightforward and the mythos isn't really involved in the story. I do wish that we had been given more details about the actual Laqueus Equation and the code that solved it, but I understand why the writers had to handwave that sort of thing.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: The Last Equation
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Delta Green: Jack Frost
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/04/2021 18:12:49

Just as a disclaimer, I haven’t actually run this scenario. With this being a vaguely Christmas-themed scenario, I’m not going to actually run it for a few months, but I figured I’d give my opinion on it now for everyone who is considering buying it to play around the holidays. Though the only real ties that this scenario has to the holidays are the snowy weather and the fact that it takes place around Christmas.

As far as Delta Green scenarios go, I think Jack Frost is pretty good but not great. I’ve read through and ran almost every official Delta Green scenario that Arc Dream has published, and this one ranks somewhere in the upper middle of the pack. Though considering that Delta Green scenarios in general tend to be very high quality, that’s still pretty high praise.

It’s an interesting change of pace to have the players taking the role of MAJESTIC operatives, but this necessitates them using pre-gen characters since you can’t really roll a MAJESTIC character using the core book. The scenario also suggests that your players might want to each choose a secondary character, but for reasons that I’ll get to, I really don’t think they need to do this.

The introduction of this scenario bombards you with names, ranks, organizations, and complex relationship diagrams, and this brings me to my main gripe with Jack Frost. This whole scenario is lots of fluff but very little meat. The module spends tons of time detailing background and motivations on the key NPCs and military organizations involved in the operation, but it’s hard for me to imagine most of this information being very meaningful once the scenario actually kicks off. Jack Frost just gets way more bogged down with the military bureaucracy stuff than it really needs to.

The book lays out the course of events over three days, and suggests that you’ll need roughly three sessions to run Jack Frost, but I don’t think that’s true at all. Behind all of the names, and dates, and scientific readings, and acronyms, and codenames, there’s not that much for your players to actually do in this scenario. Without spoiling anything, there’s only really 2 or 3 things the players can do to affect the plot and the overall outcome of the scenario. This is one of those scenarios that is more or less always going to play out the same way regardless of your players’ actions.

There’s lots of meaningless fluff that you could trim away from Jack Frost and I think you could easily run it as a one-shot if you wanted to. I really wish that the scenario had added more for the players to actually do in the town of Willis; more clues to uncover or strange artifacts to interact with or horrific encounters to have in the snow. I don't think that this scenario really captures the feeling of actually being a MAJESTIC operative studying alien devices, and that's a shame. If you run the scenario the way the designers intended, your players are going to spend most of their time arguing with military officers inside of a trailer.

All of that being said, Jack Frost is still a pretty memorable scenario with lots of cool and creepy moments and a very bombastic finale. If it was stripped down a bit and sold for $4.99 (which is how it should have been marketed IMO), I’d be a lot more positive about it, but I still like it quite a bit and I think it will make for a fun Christmas scenario.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: Jack Frost
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The Lamenting Lighthouse
Publisher: Dungeon Masters Guild
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 10/03/2021 15:27:50

This is a pretty cool scenario with some interesting encounters. My main complaint is that it has much more of an adventure feel than a horror feel. As written, it doesn't really have that sense of atmosphere or dread that a good horror scenario has, though a good GM could certainly inject those things. If you're looking for a fun nautical scenario, I think this is a pretty good choice, but if you're looking for a Halloween one-shot like I was, I don't think this really fits the bill.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Lamenting Lighthouse
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Delta Green: Hourglass
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/08/2021 19:37:17

I'm usually a huge fan of the standalone Delta Green scenarios, but this one didn't quite work for me. Don't get me wrong, there's things about it that I like: the inciting mystery is really compelling and I like the idea of the Agents investigating a weird cult (it reminds me a lot of that one X-files episode). And without going into spoilers, there's some intriguing possibilites for some interesting role playing stuff that could happen.

Unfortunately my biggest problem with this scenario is that I just don't find the cult itself to be a very interesting adversary for the Agents. They have a lot of weird rituals and beliefs and practices, and there is some creepy stuff that might happen, depending on your players' choices, but I have a feeling that most of the time this scenario is just going to devolve into "Agents find cult, Agents investigate cult, cult finds out about Agents, Agents shoot cultists"

Like I said, the cult itself has some interesting stuff going on, but I don't really feel like any of this interesting stuff really contributes to the overall scenario and/or player experience in a meaningful way. If you've already played a lot of other DG scenarios, maybe pick this one up just to check it out and see if you like it more than I did; it's definitely at least worth reading through. But if you're a newer Handler looking for a DG scenario, I'd start elsewhere.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: Hourglass
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Delta Green: Ex Oblivione
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 09/08/2021 19:22:22

This scenario has everything that you'd want out of a Delta Green one-shot: horror, mystery, insanity, and a deadly showdown at the end. I like the way that the central mystery revolves around an unexpected link to Cthulhu mythos and the Delta Green organization's history. I really appreciate the way that the author laid out all of the clues and information that the Agents can learn from investigating the scene of the murders; it's much better than the hodgepodge way that this information is usually presented. My only real complaint about this scenario is that some of the plot devices that are used to lead the players from one point to the next are a little clunky, but a good handler could hopefully come up with some more elegant devices to use. Overall this is one of the better Delta Green scenarios out there and I highly reccomend it, especially if you're looking for something with a very action-packed and deadly climax.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: Ex Oblivione
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Delta Green: Impossible Landscapes
Publisher: Arc Dream Publishing
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 04/05/2021 14:39:52

I love the mythos around Howard Chamber’s The King in Yellow, and I love Delta Green, so when I found out about this campaign I was pretty damn excited. So does Impossible Landscapes live up to the hype? Is it Delta Green’s version of Masks of Nyarlathotep? The short answer is yes. This book is nothing short of amazing and if you like Delta Green you should buy this book immediately.

I’m the kind of person who reads RPG books for fun, even modules that I have no intention of running. I’ve read quite a few books for many different RPGs, and I feel pretty comfortable saying that Impossible Landscapes is probably my favorite RPG module of all time. It’s sprawling, ambitious, horrifying, and most importantly, creative as hell. It explores and expands upon the Carcosa mythos more deeply than any other piece of media I’ve seen, while at the same time respecting Chamber’s original vision.

Impossible Landscapes is broken into 4 interconnected segments. The introduction, set in 1995, is a reimagining of an older scenario which sees the Agents looking into the disappearance of a young artist in New York City. From there, the action jumps forward to 2015, where the same Agents are once again enlisted by Delta Green, this time to look into some disappearances at a psychiatric facility in Boston. Without going into too much detail, this sets the Agents on a journey of surreal horror and madness as they discover the true nature of reality.

This module asks a lot of both the Agents and the Handler. Agents will have to be clever and inventive to solve many of this campaign’s challenges. There’s actually not a ton of combat in Impossible Landscapes, but due to the sheer amount of horrific circumstances and revelations that are thrown at the Agents, PC death and especially insanity is probably going to be very, very common. But for the Handler, this module is nothing short of intimidating, with tons of NPCs, handouts, plot details, and possible encounters to keep track of. And on top of that, there are many cases where the Handler has to keep track of and remember many, many small details at once as they unfold in real time. This is definitely not a scenario for a newer Delta Green Handler.

This is also not a scenario for the squeamish, as it contains disturbing and unsettling scenes and motifs throughout. It never really goes into anything sexual, but there is lots of violence, body horror, psychological horror, and just plain insanity. Just reading Impossible Landscapes is pretty unsettling, and the authors definitely lean into that in some fun ways. There’s a lot of creepy little details in this book that only the Handler will ever see.

My only real complaint with Impossible Landscapes has to do with NPCs. In my opinion, this book doesn’t do a great job when it comes to introducing NPCs to the Handler. It’ll tell you a lot about what they look like (the NPC portraits in this book are fantastic, by the way) and how they interact with the Agents, but it doesn’t really communicate their overall place in the story. There were a lot of times when an NPC would be introduced, seeming to be one type of character, and then like 100 pages later would be revealed to be something completely different. Or an NPC who seemed initially of little importance would suddenly become vital to the story much later, without any warning. These types of twists are fun for the Agents but there’s no reason to throw them at the Handler. I just wanted a few sentences like: “This is so-and-so, right now the Agents think he is [x] but he is actually [y]” or “This NPC might not seem very useful right now, but make sure that you set him up properly because he’s going to be very important later on.”

This is a relatively small complaint though, and overall I can’t recommend this book enough. If you have a Delta Green group you owe it to them and yourself to run this scenario. Impossible Landscapes is a must-buy.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Delta Green: Impossible Landscapes
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New Tales of the Miskatonic Valley - An Anthology of Call of Cthulhu Scenarios set in the 1920s
Publisher: Stygian Fox
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser]
Date Added: 03/27/2021 11:51:04

This book is a good, solid collection of CoC scenarios. I bought it mostly for Seth Skorkowsky's A Mother's Love, which is one of the better scenarios in the book, though it does have some typos and it's a bit shorter than I would have hoped. The two Kingsport scenarios, Malice Everlasting and The Night War, are both fantastic, with The Night War in particular being one of the most unique and interesting CoC scenarios I've ever read. The remaining scenarios all average out to be pretty good, except for Spirit of Industry, which I just plain didn't like. It's just too slow-paced and relies too much on NPCs accompanying the investigators everywhere for my taste.

I really appreciate how all of the scenarios explore the history and details of the towns in which they take place, almost treating the town as a character in the story. There's definitely a healthy respect for and knowledge of Lovecraft's work on display here. If you need some more 1-3 session scenarios for CoC, this book is definitely worth considering.

It's worth noting though that Proof of Life and The Night War contain some pretty intense and graphic scenes, so you probably shouldn't run those two with younger players.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
New Tales of the Miskatonic Valley - An Anthology of Call of Cthulhu Scenarios set in the 1920s
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