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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by J C S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/06/2022 14:12:01

I was really excited for these updates, fully backed the kickstarter, but was underwhelmed with the final product. I don't think this is a fully independently playable alternative to 5e, that is also compatible, as balanced, and would be as fun on it's own as 5e is. The design is just not quite there. Lots of great ideas and fun ways to spice things up, which I definitely recommend hacking into 5e if your PCs are interested in specific areas/ideas, but I feel like if you want to add things like more old-school exploration and resource tracking to your 5e (or 5e adjacent game), for example, things like Five Torches Deep do it better and simpler. And sadly the complexity/mechanics they add just doesn't quite come together for me to seem like it'll add a corresponding amount of fun.

Also, the other two books are still great and perfectly good additions as DM tools for 5e, so I think their overall value is retained despite A5E not quite coming together as a system for me.

But again, lots of fun ideas and inspirations, even if the system as a whole doesn't quite fulfill what was promised.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 08/01/2022 05:38:59

Honestly the best system to play DnD. With this book every class has it's purpose and tools to roleplay (man I love Sorcerer and Bard from now). Lots of small mechanics, that I was looking for too long (medicine, weapon difference and adventure mechanic). Will never return to DnD 5. Only A5E!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
A.C.E. #4: Strange Science
by Bob V. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/14/2022 03:53:26

For a few days, I have soloed an adventure using A.C.E. #1: Awfully Cheerful Engine! (39 pages). This d6 dice pool system is described as a cinematic tabletop roleplaying game of comedic action . The adventure I used was designed for this system, A.C.E. #4, Strange Science (36 pages). I used a 43 card Magic The Gathering deck as the solo engine. Here are the highlights. So, I started with four fifteen year old PCs and one older brother, Carl. He is 21 years old, is a college student (scientist), and owns a car. He is always driving the other four around.

The first location was the high school. They picked up several clues here and had lots of choices on where to go next. They decided on New-Trition because the pod-people love the drink that is only available there. The second location was the new health food store. It was being operated by a pod-person. It was difficult to converse with them because they are new to the English language and use strange word combinations. Luckily, they are so new that they have no idea how to lie. It was here they found out where Fit Juice is made. The third location was the Osterman Lab. Carl discovered that he could hypnotize the pod-people with his silver crucifix necklace. More questions were asked and more clues were found. Carl made two bombs. The clues led them to the fourth location, the caverns below. They killed the alien-vine-thing with fire. The entire thing turned to ash and the connected alien was killed at the very bottom. It was here they got to see the two gates (different sizes). Carl attached a bomb to the dead alien, set the timer, and threw it through the smaller portal. The portal disappeared. Next, they started killing pod-people. Some did escape (with the food source gone they all eventually died).

The last location was the local radio station where the pod-people had altered the equipment. It was sending out subliminal messages to those humans listening to that station. After parking the car there they met Dunwood (another scientist and an adult). He told them he had seen Men In Black taking out a strange looking artifact. The radio waves were okay now. The PCs told Dunwood about the second portal and where it was. They warned him about the pod-people left alive. They also put him in charge and were done with this world-saving-stuff. It was time to go to bed. Give this a try! I am sure your playthrough will be different.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
A.C.E. #4: Strange Science
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A.C.E. #1: The Awfully Cheerful Engine!
by Bob V. G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 07/14/2022 03:50:45

For a few days, I have soloed an adventure using A.C.E. #1: Awfully Cheerful Engine! (39 pages at DriveThruRPG, less than one dollar). This d6 dice pool system is described as a cinematic tabletop roleplaying game of comedic action . The adventure I used was designed for this system, A.C.E. #4, Strange Science (same place, same price). I used a 43 card Magic The Gathering deck as the solo engine. Here are the highlights. So, I started with four fifteen year old PCs and one older brother, Carl. He is 21 years old, is a college student (scientist), and owns a car. He is always driving the other four around.

The first location was the high school. They picked up several clues here and had lots of choices on where to go next. They decided on New-Trition because the pod-people love the drink that is only available there. The second location was the new health food store. It was being operated by a pod-person. It was difficult to converse with them because they are new to the English language and use strange word combinations. Luckily, they are so new that they have no idea how to lie. It was here they found out where Fit Juice is made. The third location was the Osterman Lab. Carl discovered that he could hypnotize the pod-people with his silver crucifix necklace. More questions were asked and more clues were found. Carl made two bombs. The clues led them to the fourth location, the caverns below. They killed the alien-vine-thing with fire. The entire thing turned to ash and the connected alien was killed at the very bottom. It was here they got to see the two gates (different sizes). Carl attached a bomb to the dead alien, set the timer, and threw it through the smaller portal. The portal disappeared. Next, they started killing pod-people. Some did escape (with the food source gone they all eventually died).

The last location was the local radio station where the pod-people had altered the equipment. It was sending out subliminal messages to those humans listening to that station. After parking the car there they met Dunwood (another scientist and an adult). He told them he had seen Men In Black taking out a strange looking artifact. The radio waves were okay now. The PCs told Dunwood about the second portal and where it was. They warned him about the pod-people left alive. They also put him in charge and were done with this world-saving-stuff. It was time to go to bed. Give this a try! I am sure your playthrough will be different.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
A.C.E. #1: The Awfully Cheerful Engine!
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Level Up: Trials & Treasures (A5E)
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/29/2022 15:22:40

This is the weakest of the three "core" A5E books by a long shot; if it didn't include the necessary Journey rules that govern many player characters' Journey abilities, it would be almost a complete wash. It's in this book that you can see most clearly that A5E does not live up to its stated goals of building out all three "pillars" of Fifth Edition (social, exploration, combat).

Like the base 5e DMG, this book contains sections expounding on the designers' philosophy of how a DM might create their campaign, things like player engagement, worldbuilding, cosmology, etc. To its credit, it spends a lot more time and energy on player safety tools than the DMG does and emphasizes player comfort and community -- a welcome addition in the hobby and something that Pathfinder 2e also did in its DM guidebook. It also contains the nuts-and-bolts information you'd expect in a DM-facing guide, such as a treasure and magic item compendium, information on dungeon hazards, traps, illnesses, etc. All of that stuff is competently presented and more or less equivalent to what you'd find in the 5e DMG in terms of utility.

It also includes some welcome content that is NOT in the 5e DMG, such as a full 50 pages of "exploration challenges," small vignettes like the "Killing Cloud" that can be popped into your exploration segments as useful, or at the very least inspire your own creativity in designing exploration challenges that go beyond "monster destroyed our food." There's an appreciable variety of quality in the challenges, and some of them reduce to "if your party succeeds at this specific check, they win. If not, they don't," but even if you don't use them verbatim (I typically don't in my group) they still provide useful seeds for you to design your own exploration encounters.

However, like the Adventurer's Guide, this book shows its relative immaturity in design by the types and utility of DM tools it includes, and in comparison to the 5e DMG there are quite a lot of useful DM tools simply absent. One example is the book's approach to campaign, adventure, and encounter design. The "Worldbuilding" chapter, 13 pages long, contains: 5 pages expounding on "guiding principles" of campaign creation: the premise of the campaign, its scope, the difference between self-contained sessions and serialized sessions, etc.; 3 pages expounding on "approaches" to worldbuilding, for example articulating different extents to which a DM might design facets of the campaign that the players won't necessarily engage with, as well as providing simple prompts such as "how was the world created?" or "is there an afterlife?" that might spur DM thinking at the top level; and 5 pages just presenting the system's default cosmology. The next chapter, "Encounter Design," is 15 pages long and fully 12 of those pages are taken up (a) talking about monster CR for combat encounters and (b) presenting encounter hazards such as acid or high gravity. The remaining three pages list a few examples of exploration and social encounters.

These two chapters, taken as a whole, seem to demonstrate an affinity for providing the reader with information and hoping that they are inspired, rather than providing tools for them to capitalize on their inspiration and actually create. The book shifts from pontificating on campaign cosmology and a "functionalist vs simulationist" discussion to providing detailed mechanical analysis of its own CR system -- without ever providing a reader the means of walking through the process of creating an adventure or a series of encounters, much less a full campaign. The section in the "Encounter Design" chapter discussing "Social Encounters," despite mentioning that the majority of encounters in a given adventure are likely to be social, presents almost no actionable guidance on creating compelling social encounters, instead relying on expository truths such as "a social encounter can be used to provide information to the players" and going no further. The book also doesn't deliver on expanding all three of the "pillars" of 5e, constraining exploration encounters by their CR like combat encounters and providing no guidance whatsoever on how to build, run, or award XP for social encounters beyond simply saying that it might be a good idea to do so.

The 5e DMG has its faults, but one thing that I have come back to over and over in my tenure as a 5e DM is that, throughout the entire book, there are actual design tools for DMs to use to build satisfying encounters, tools that help DMs learn what makes a compelling adventure, what makes a satisfying encounter, what makes the game worth playing, beyond simply what makes a combat or exploration challenge mechanically balanced. The DMG contains tools for building narrative arcs, designing compelling NPCs, sketching communities and dungeon environments, and even gigantic tables for building random dungeons that have seeded truly memorable experiences for my players. By comparison, this product presents a thousand interesting trees for DMs but never weaves them into anything even partially resembling a forest, and certainly doesn't teach a reader how to plant them. For DMs who are already skilled arborists, it might be useful in an encyclopedic sense, but for new DMs my fear is that the focus on presenting information rather than teaching concepts and skills will either be confusing, overwhelming, or simply a turn off.

EDIT: As you can see, the publisher has weighed in, arguing that the book is not intended to serve in a DMG-like capacity, and is instead intended to simply present the Journey rules and the magic items compendium. This is fair! And I do want to acknowledge that the back-of-the-book description of this product agrees with the comment. I think that, in that case, what I'd ask is: why include this material at all, much less as the "introduction" to the book? The first sentence of the book is "What does it mean to be the Narrator?" The first chapter of the book is "Gamemastery Troubleshooting." These might be ancilary to the intended purpose of the book, but front-loading them like that really gives a different idea of the book's goals and intentions, and it preps readers for certain types of content, setting up a sort of "genre contract" that isn't followed through on throughout the book. It would have been nice if the introduction had been more clear about what this book was intended to be, so that the publisher didn't have to weigh in on third-party review sites.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Trials & Treasures (A5E)
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Creator Reply:
Hi there! Thanks for the review! To clarify, this book is not the equivalent of WotC's DMG, and is not intended to be. While it does contain some game mastery advice which we couldn't fit into the Adventurer's Guide (as it was already 550 pages), this book is a book of journey rules and magic items (dungeons will be covered in our upcoming Dungeon Delver's Guide). We might publish a 'DMG' equivalent one day, but we don't currently have plans to do so. We have not (as yet) published a book about the social pillar, but to be as transparent as we strive to be, this is not that book. Hope that helps clarify what this book is! :)
Level Up: Monstrous Menagerie (A5E)
by Michael B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/22/2022 17:34:06

This is the strongest of the three core A5E books, and it's clear that it was written with a coherent and comprehensive vision for what monsters in A5E should look like. Many of the monsters here are based on their base 5e counterparts, with tweaks to abilities, attack economy, etc., but there are also some new, definitely-not-under-WotC-copyright monsters that are very cool on their own. Honestly, the monsters in this book could be used to create more exciting combat encounters in your base 5e game as well.

In addition to the mechanical statblocks for each monster, this book includes, like the Monster Manual before it, a section of flavor text describing the nature of the creature, its modes of activity, etc. In a welcome addition, each monster section also includes a "Legends and Lore" table that provides a means for players to gain information on the creature and suggested tidbits for DMs to dole out at given check DCs, as well as tables for "signs" that can alert PCs to the presence of the monster and tables for its out-of-combat behavior and presentation. These aren't something that everyone will use, but it might be useful for new DMs and for my money it's a great addition in terms of helping spark creative interactions with these fantastic creatures. Each monster also includes a set of suggested encounters for the monster at different CR ratings, with possible allies for the monster as well as possible rewards, again helping everyone from novice to time-crunched DMs create encounters that are more multidimensional and engaging.

Most crucially, the monster stat blocks in this book are better designed for readability, with magic-wielding monsters having their spell attacks just listed in the Actions block, saving you as the DM from having to flip back and forth between two books saying "just a moment!" as your players fall out of the tension of wondering what fresh hell the demon they just summoned is about to wreak. Blocks also have combat descriptions, giving an intuitive and explicit description of what a monster might do in combat, discussing its priorities and self-preservation methods, etc. Particularly appreciated are the bits that say "at X HP or fewer, the monster flees to safety via Y method" -- for new DMs especially, I expect that the explicit recognition that not every monster fights to zero HP like a video game will really prompt some excellent reflection on the game.

Finally, a greater number of monsters than in base 5e have variants presented, which can help lend flavor to your combat encounters or just create opportunities for players to engage in "elite" boss fights of a much higher challenge level. Overall, it's clear that the authorship and editorial process for this product succeeded the best out of all the A5E content, as everything here feels like it was intentional, cohesive, and designed with all aspects of a player's experience in mind. My only major gripe with this book is the layout -- unlike the base 5e MM, which puts stat blocks in their own very obviously visually-separated sidebars, stat blocks here are simply included in-line, sometimes breaking over columns or across pages. It's the kind of thing that just adds a few seconds to the time it takes to look up a monster, but it is an annoyance from a design perspective.

Overall, though, this book is easily worth the money to purchase digitally, if only for the benefit you will gain in designing and implementing combat encounters that are more than sacks of HP taking turns flailing at each other until one of them reaches zero. I wish the entire A5E system could have been designed with this level of quality.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Monstrous Menagerie (A5E)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by Mike B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/22/2022 12:45:15

Just to put this out there at the start: This is a product conceived of, designed, and published by enthusiasts working loosely collaboratively, not a dedicated professional design team backed by a megalithic corporate publisher. It is very obviously not a product of a single vision, and that makes it a challenge to write a concise review of the entire product or give it a single rating. Some parts of this product are quite good and some parts needed a bit more revision. Some parts cohere really well and some parts appear to have been designed completely in isolation. Etc.

It's also worth it to be clear at the start -- the product description, as of the date of this review, explicitly states that this product is "An advanced rule system which adds depth to the core 5th Edition rules while maintaining full compatibility." This is false. It is either a mistaken advertisement on the part of the publisher, or is a duplicitous statement that depends on a definition of "full compatibility" that means something other than "entirely compatible." You simply cannot drop components of base 5e into this game or vice-versa. Most crucially, you can't swap subclasses between this game's classes and base 5e's classes without work on your part to adapt to mechanics shifts such as the A5E fighter lacking the base figthter's Action Surge feature.

Having gotten those major gripes out of the way at the start, what I can say is that this product is well-conceived and that parts of it really improve on the base 5e experience. For groups looking to give their players a greater number of mechanical options at character creation and advancement, most of the content in this product will be a fun, welcome addition to play. For those looking to beef up the tactical combat experience of base 5e, the system will deliver a lot -- a LOT -- of new crunch. For those playing in older-style sandbox games where the fun is in meeting a new mechanical challenge, regardless of where that challenge comes from or how it "fits" in the world, this system will be a slam-dunk.

But, for those for whom immersion is a major priority, the sizeable dissonance between mechanics and theme will be a constant, jarring presence during play. For those frustrated with WotC's problematic racial essentialism, the new character origin rules will be an incomplete solution. For those who don't have a ton of time to sift through rules and try and parse out rules-as-intended from rules-as-written, you had better hope your DM has more time and patience on their hands than you do.

The best feature of the game, by far, is the revamped expertise system (which, just to be clear, is another component of this game that simply isn't compatible with base 5e). Rather than doubling your proficiency bonus, gaining expertise in a circumstance grants you an additional die to roll, similar to but broader than the base DMG's alternative "proficiency die" system. It really helps give player characters a sense of specialization; in particular, it met the needs of one of my players who dislikes 5e's bounded accuracy system because it makes him feel like he's never truly advancing. There are a variety of places where expertise comes into play in A5E, and there are a lot of options for how to gain it, when to apply, etc.

The system also does a good job of codifying and reducing ambiguity in certain base 5e situations, such as a player saying "I want to jump on this dragon and try to attack it while it flies away!" and the DM scratching their head and trying to remember the grapple rules. The set of "basic combat maneuvers" helps put players on the same page with respect to those kinds of called-shots situations.

Not every new system or mechanic is as well-designed as the expertise system, however. Within the 20+ pages of combat maneuvers available to players, there are more than a few head-scratchers -- "trap" choices that are clearly inferior to similarly-worded alternatives, maneuvers that clearly were designed mechanics-first and immersion second or not at all, ambiguous wording that means your group will have to house-rule more than a few maneuver outcomes, maneuvers that seem to be custom-made for certain classes but are inexplicably unavailable to those characters, etc. The most frustrating example for me, and an example that IMO best demonstrates the idea that the game's disparate parts were designed largely siloed from one another, is the maneuver "Death Blow" -- basically an assassination feature. It is, incredibly curiously, unavailable to the A5E's version of the Assassin Rogue subclass, the Cuttthroat. There are also maneuvers that might let a gnome with STR 6 throw a red dragon 15 feet, etc. etc. It feels whoever designed this section of the game thought primarily about "fun mechanical things to do in a tactical combat game" rather than ways to create evocative combat scenes in a tabletop RPG.

The character origin system is another point of frustration for me. Most of it is useful and good, but the system still doesn't avoid the racial essentialism of WotC's origins system, even though it describes explicitly the importance of distinguishing between a character's cultural upbringing and their genetic heritage. The most egregious example is the dwarven heritage, which leans deeper into the "all dwarves are crafty" stereotype than even base 5e does, giving all dwarves proficiency with artisan's tools, a far more niche choice than weapon proficiencies. There also isn't a coherent and consistent theme throughout the origins chapter -- some heritages, like dwarves, lean heavily on a creation narrative (leading to, e.g., artisanry being a "heritable" component of being a dwarf somehow), while others talk about how heritages evolved (occasionally leading to equally frustrating "heritable traits" such as, e.g., the human's "sheer stubbornness and will to live" or the still-tribal wilderness-wanderer focus of the orc heritage).

For me, personally, the biggest frustration with this system is the dissonance between features' mechanics and theme. For better or worse, one of the ways that base 5e stands out is that subclass options feel very coherent with the theme of the character. In A5E, it feels like features either come from a mechanics-first mindset and have a thin veneer of flavor on top of them, or feel like someone said "wouldn't it be cool if you could do this!" and didn't think about how the feature would play out mechanically. And it really, REALLY takes me out of the game when reading the rules.

The most hilariously egregious example is the Marshal class's "miraculous protector" feature, which, when an ally "within range of your Commanding Presence" (which, when you gain the feature, is a 30-ft, LINE OF HEARING aura-style radius) is hit by a critical hit, you can use your reaction to "become the target of the attack." In a vacuum, this seems like a cool tactical moment where you shove a party member out of the way of an attack and take the hit. BUT -- because your Commanding Presence is 30-ft radius and line-of-hearing only, your Marshal does not need to be adjacent to their ally, or even be on their feet or free to move. They can be fully restrained and behind a wall, still allowing you to "become the target" of the attack -- which also raises questions about what it means to "become the target" of a melee attack 30 feet away from you and on the other side of the wall. There is no explanatory language in the feature that could lead a DM to make a consistent ruling based on more than a personal sense of what should or shouldn't be possible, and unless your group is highly coherent and functional, I could see it leading to rules squabbles. Another example is how Marshals and Berserkers gain abilities that "take control" of NPCs, such as requiring an NPC to "make or accept a challenge" (so a 9th level berserker can challenge the Queen of the realm to a duel and somehow compel her to accept the duel?) or other things like that.

For your group, these might be features, not bugs -- beer-and-pretzels groups where it's fun to see what kinds of silly escapades you can get into and out of, or monster-of-the-week groups where there aren't lasting consequences will probably just incorporate these things without problems. But for narrative-heavy groups, these rules introduce ambiguity and chances for frustration or above-the-table conflict.

All of this says nothing of the fact that the book is simply not well-edited. It is riddled with typos, creating further ambiguity in the rules, and would have benefited from another layout pass (the character origin chapter mentions skill specialties only in passing and refers you to two other sections 400 pages later in the book, one of which only refers you to the other section), and -- most egregiously -- doesn't include the Journey rules that so many characters' features make reference to.

From this review you can probably gauge what kind of game I run, and you can probably gauge whether these criticisms are likely to apply to your own usage of this product. My opinion is that this product solves some of the well-known problems with base 5e that have cropped up over the years, and makes good use of its basis in the 5e system, but introduces a host of new problems that, to me, signify a less experienced hand at the tiller and a lack of care for elegance and coherence in design. It borders close on being a system "designed by committee," and you'll notice the places where its Frankensteinean creation process resulted in obvious stitches and grafts.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
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[WOIN] Endeavour-class Starship Deck Plans
by Gunnar E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/16/2022 22:36:17

These deck plans are the best I've found. They are flawless for VTT and I've edited some of them to make larger rooms. Expensive for PNGs but worth every penny.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
[WOIN] Endeavour-class Starship Deck Plans
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War of the Burning Sky: The Complete Campaign (D&D 3.5)
by Edward N. R. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/14/2022 15:55:30

I got this to run for some quite jaded players of long standing. Although it has requires a bit of "copy and paste" for the NPC's (the appendix of all the NPCs is alphabetical, rather than "as you meet them", which is a pain), the players are really enjoying it, and they feel they actually have choice, with their choice affect the outcomes not just of the situation they are in, but the overall direction of the game. Then side-quests for second characters? How many sessions are in here? This is a major bargain! Finally, being free of a overall campaign setting, you can drop this into any world with a big enough space, or create a world around it.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
War of the Burning Sky: The Complete Campaign (D&D 3.5)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by Clarke P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/23/2022 10:41:29

Really obsessed with this product! They provide so many more options for Players and GMs alike, all while keeping everything within a manageable level of complexity. I look at 5e with a bit of disappointment now that I have A5e. On top of everything, the creators are really involved in the community and offer lots of support and updates.

Even if you decide you don't want everything in these books, they're still invaluable resources for providing more options and guidance on how to run your 5e game. That being said, I don't see myself going back to 5e any time soon now that I have this!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by João S. P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/23/2022 10:11:45

To be honest this book was a great disappointment for me and my group. We followed the project since the early days and had hi expectations for it. But at some point in the playtest it lost their way. To a point that even having the option of using the classes players prefer to use the original 5e ones. At some point we abandoned this book just for lack of popularity on the table.

It was a shame cause we all agree with the diagnosis. But we did not like the particular solution that this book offers.

To put salt in the injure. The compatibility with the original 5e is misleading. It sure is compatible but with a lot of limitations and extra work. To the point that you have to choose to go with full original or full this new rules. And we end up opting for the original.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Monstrous Menagerie (A5E)
by Jacob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2022 21:48:25

From a DM's perspective, this is easily the best book of a good series. A lot of monsters are short chapters, They could have been printed as stand alone supplements. Lore, behaviour, tactics, variants... you could run multiple oneshots on a lot of the individual entries.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Monstrous Menagerie (A5E)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by Jacob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2022 21:37:31

Everything in 5e, plus a whole lot more. With no increase in complexity. I recently started two tables of mostly new players. One with 5e. One with a5e. It took us a couple of sessions to get going, and then we were racing. But a5e just has a hell of a lot more possiblities in play.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
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Level Up: Trials & Treasures (A5E)
by Jacob P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/16/2022 21:30:41

Unlike the 5e DMG, i actually use this book. A lot.

When runnng 5e i'd have four to five supplements and blog posts open to deal with everything outside a dungeon. What is the weather? What happened on the trip? Can we go down that alley? What is on the corpse? Can we sell body parts on the open market? How much? What can we do with all the money we made from selling bulette eggs?

Pretty much all of this is in T&T.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Trials & Treasures (A5E)
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Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
by Matt V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 04/15/2022 12:47:33

I introduced Level Up: Advanced 5E to my gaming group, and it has quickly become a favourite. We all like D&D and 5E, but 5E is so cookie-cutter that characters often feel flat or like retreads. A5E offers a huge variety of character creation and advancement options by decoupling a PC's species (or "heritage") from their culture (among other changes), as well as extensive changes to the classes themselves. The addition of features like expertise dice make skills and ability checks feel valuable, and not just accessories tacked on as an afterthought to combat abilities. Exploration challenges offer a great variety of additional engagement for players, making travel fun and interesting again. Where we have made use of 5E material, there has been little to no difficulty in making it work equally well with A5E.

I'm very pleased with this system, and look forward to running and playing it even more!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Level Up: Adventurer's Guide (A5E)
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