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Legendary Mediums
by Thomas M. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/10/2019 12:38:23

Currently playing the playtest version (though it was late playtest so is basically the same AFAIK) and it's 100% what I wanted paizo's medium to be. It's more on the powerful side but not so much so it'd overshadow any other first party classes. The addition of spirit feats and the various spirit affinities gives the right amount of daily flex I wanted out of the medium, and not being locked into a specific spirit for 24h is great. They'll probably need a few little tweaks to fit your group's balance, and IIRC some things still dont line up perfectly (like the favored class bonus to increase seance boons with the guardian spirit's boon is kinda weird).



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Mediums
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Kingdoms
by Fotis V. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/02/2019 16:18:21

A fairly solid conversion of the pathfinder rules, all in all. The most dissapointing thing about it is the lack of support for the title. It's been years since the release and a fairly critical component of the system, the settlement sheet, is still missing.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Kingdoms
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Mythic Marvels
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/24/2019 05:12:59

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This mythic plug-in clocks in at 22 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 13 pages of content – though, as always, it should be noted that there is quite a lot of content cramped inside of this pdf.

This review was requested to be moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of my patreons.

So, what is this? It is, in short, a book that provides the means for GMs to make mythic rules more than just a template to be added on top of characters and monsters; it is about mythic forces authoring the destiny of narratives; not being a tool of it. The idea is that the world is mutable and shaped by the deeds of mythic entities – resulting in the creation of marvels. If you remember, for example the difference of Witcher 3’s depiction of Toussaint in “Blood and Wine” and its radically different palette, or when thinking about Camelot, Eldorado, Xanadu (the inspiration of Xin-Shalast), etc., one can see how potent beings may alter the fabric of the world. The book supplements this concept with rules for incidental marvels, accompanying e.g. maximum damage rolls, crucial crits etc. – the hero falls, and blood rains; the crows all caw, etc. – the cosmetic concept of incidental marvels need not have rules repercussions.

Mythic trials, on the other hand, may create marvels beyond the capabilities of characters of the respective mythic tier.

Now, the pdf provides a smattering of concisely codified effects – like the alteration of terrain /difficult terrain that may knock you prone as earth quakes, withers or plan-like blooms, etc.) or areas of spellblight. At mid-to high-tiers, artifacts may be created, undead or haunts may be generated, curses unleashed (massive 2-page table with item categories by tier and suggested cursed items provided!), and if you’re playing with Ultimate Campaign’s fame-mechanics, there’s a tie-in-here as well. The awesome concept of fey impulses (see Forest Kingdom Compendium) may also be tied in this way, and occult adventures ley lines or locus spirits may be included. Structures may be ruined. Rumormongering may have the rumor take on a life of its own (extra kudos if you use this for an Adahn-situation…and kudos if you got this by now super-dated reference… ;P) and settlement qualities may be gained or lost.

The pdf also provides a bit of guidance about reversing marvels, and nets you a great tier-by-tier list of trial marvels and suggested effects, allowing you to judge their impact and presenting thus a great means to think about them in a streamlined manner, as opposed to just going by gut-feeling: A 10th tier character’s marvel may be a subcontinental-scale earthquake, while a 2nd tier’s marvel may awaken a dead creature as an undead, for example. Incidental marvels also get such a tier-by-tier breakdown that helps you think of them in a meaningful way. In case you need some inspiration for mythic trials, there are plenty of concepts provided there as well.

Beyond those, there also are quite a bunch of path abilities provided: We get 5 universal path abilities: Perhaps your presence unsettles the spirits, allowing you to cast mage hand, ghost sound, unseen servant (latter not italicized properly) at will; your healing can make plant-life bloom when you also spend mythic power; you can quickly sculpt as per expeditious excavation (at higher tiers stone shape, wall of stone), and what about sweeping strikes that clear difficult terrain or using your breath for mythic gust of wind or wind wall? I love these! They are not just numbers and boosts, they are the stuff of legends. 3 3rd tier universal path abilities allow for speed-increase, burrowing or ex nihilo creation, and the 3 6th tier abilities let you use earthquake or mythic move earth, with higher tiers allowing for nasty curses from Horror Adventures (one of those isn’t properly italicized). Move mountain allows you to move 30-foot cubes of earth in a single round, and wind rider lets you control the winds and ride whirlwinds!! Frickin’ awesome! This is what mythic gameplay should be about!

Conclusion: Editing is exceedingly precise on a formal and rules-language level. Formatting missed a few italicizations, but otherwise remains precise. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf sports nice full-color artworks, though fans of Legendary Games will be familiar with them. The pdf comes with a single bookmark for the ToC; while this is a short book, more would have been nice.

David N. Ross’ mythic marvels are AWESOME. I love how they help the GM think of mythic might as more than just an escalation of numbers. They help you make the mythic powers feel more like the powers of legend, wielded by truly legendary heroes and villains. Its main draw is how it helps you think of mythic power as something more – and in my book, as something more, something that really helps mythic characters feel like more than just super-powered versions of regular heroes. As such, this is a radiant success, and I’d warmly recommend this to just about any GM and group using mythic adventures – I’d consider this to be an EZG-essential book for mythic adventures, in fact. However, the few hiccups in formatting prevent me from rating this the full 5 stars, making my final verdict 4.5 stars + seal of approval, rounded up. (As an aside: This material is included in the massive Mythic Character Codex as well – so f you’re looking for the big collection of mythic material, get that tome instead!)

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Marvels
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Mythic Monsters #36: Mesoamerica
by Mattias B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/19/2019 02:51:04

This product is seriously lacking. It just contains pure statblocks and nothing else.

  • There are no discussions of a mesoamerican bestiary and how it tells us something about the world view, cosmology and mythology of these cultures.
  • Almost no art to speak of, you have to look up pictures on your own.
  • No examples of how such creatures live or how they would interact with the players.
  • No story hooks.
  • The product says "Mesoamerica" but includes South American countries as well.


Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #36: Mesoamerica
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Mythic Monsters #50: Celtic
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/17/2019 06:18:38

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic Monsters-series clocks in at 34 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 3 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page inside of back cover, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 22 pages of content, though it should be noted that we get quite a lot of text per page.

This review was, funnily enough, requested by a patreon supporter to be moved up in my reviewing queue – and it was the only mythic book that had, prior to that, not (yet) been requested, so this, in a way, makes the completionist in me grin.

Now, as always in these books, we begin with supplemental content – and this time around, the subject matter would be “Naked Courage”, referring to the tendency of some Celtic cultures fighting without armor. In Pathfinder, savage barbarian, swashbuckler or the like can be used to represent this concept, sure. This pdf adds the blue-painted warrior fighter archetype to the fray of such options. These valiant braves lose proficiency with armor, but apply blue-painted symbols to their bodies in a process that takes 1 hour of preparation as well as 1 sp per class level in a process that takes an hour. These symbols grant an AC bonus equal to ½ class level (minimum +1). Bravery is modified to net +4 to Will saves against fear, increasing by +2 for every 4 levels beyond 2nd, and 14th level makes that immunity to fear. Without freshly painted symbols, this reverts to base bravery benefits. Instead or armor training, third level nets the option to choose 1 spell-like ability from a list, and 7th, 11th and 15th level unlock their own lists of SPs and increase the number of SPs from previous lists, basically emulating a spell-list of sorts. The engine does allow for the slotting of lower level SPs in higher level slots, uses Constitution as governing ability score to determine bonus SPs, and the SPs only apply to the character. Instead of gaining an SP, the blue-painted warrior can grant herself an enhancement bonus to AC or a combination of such a bonus and armor special qualities, with a cap of only one SP until 11th level. At 19th level, armor mastery is replaced with shrug it off, a 75% chance to negate critical hits and precision damage based on the symbols – a failure to refresh them sees them slowly degrade down the fortification special ability tree.

The archetype comes with explicit mythic class feature tricks, which allow them to expend mythic power to retain symbol freshness, adding tier to armor bonus and immunity vs. non-mythic fear-sources, as well as the option of granting nearby allies half the bravery bonus. The SP-based engine-component may be tweaked to provide access to the mythic iteration, and allows for spontaneous swapping of choices made. The mythic version can also apply the benefits of these SPs to allies, and the mythic version of the mighty shrug it off allows for automatic crit and precision damage negation from non-mythic sources. It also nets allies an atk and damage boost when you negate a crit. On the nitpicky side, I noticed missing italicizations here. This guy is decent, but not exactly brilliant as far as I’m concerned.

All righty, but this fellow was not what we’re here for, right? Let’s check out the creatures! At the lowest rung of the CR-spectrum, we have nixies, which clock in at CR 1/MR 1. The mythic upgrade has two really nice new abilities. Coat of Mist blurs the nixie while near a body of water, and mythic power expenditure may upgrade this to displacement. Additionally, they get fisher’s touch, which allows for the use of a touch to baleful polymorph (italics missing) touched targets briefly, with non-mythic and charmed targets being more susceptible. Nice upgrade! Also at this CR/MR, we get a mythic upgrade of the alpluachra, who is a bit faster in water and injects its numbing slime with bite attacks as well. Additionally, they may expend a use of mythic power as an immediate action to avoid ingesting harmful alchemical substances, toxins, etc. and withstand the consumption of salt or salt water. Nice evolution of the concept.

At one CR more, CR 2/MR 1, the fuath gremlin, whose attacks now actually can hurt (thank the deities…) and whose mere presence makes waters nearby choppy, increasing the Swim DCs nearby, and they may 1/day warp wood at CL 8th, making them rather dangerous for those braving their waters. Increasing CR once more by +1, we have two CR 3/ MR 1 critters within, with the first being the water leaper receives a stunning shriek and the option to use mythic power to add a whopping +20 to Acrobatics made to leap for 1d6 rounds. The second creature at this CR/MR-array would be the pooka, who is improved to hearken closer to its mythological roots: They get selective invisibility and may execute at-range dirty tricks governed by Charisma, with the option to expend mythic power to retain their invisibility. The final low CR/MR-creature clocks in at CR 4/MR 1, the mythic spring-heeled jack, who may use their ragged capes to glide, Batman-style, with the benefits of Wingover and Flyby Attack that explicitly allows for use of e.g. the breath weapon in conjunction with it. Wounds struck by these fey bleed, and the amount increases if the target is struck by a sneak attack, and further if the target is subjected to one of the detrimental fear-based conditions.

The CR 5/MR 2 gancanagh azata gets a fey flute, which allows them to affect targets in a 60 ft.-radius with SPs sans counting towards daily uses. With their swashbuckler’s blade, they can use AoOs to penalize attack rolls; for mythic power, we get a parry, represented by the imho not very elegant comparing of attack rolls – on the plus-side, they may choose to take half damage and instead riposte, getting an AoO versus the attacker. The gancanagh’s kiss or caress banishes mental dominion, and may even, with mythic use expenditure, remove e.g. a succubus’ profane gift, though this is not guaranteed. Also at this CR/MR, we have the firbolg, whose weapons ignore 5 hardness or DR, and when targeting Medium or smaller creatures, the target must succeed on a save or have its defensive means reduced, though enhancement bonuses cannot be reduced. Additionally, mythic firbolgs get Death’s Decree – when they’d be killed, permanently incapacitated, etc., they may expend 1 mythic power as an immediate action to self breath of life or break enchantment. For an additional mythic power, the offender may also be targeted with a curse that prevents a use of a specific action for 1 year. Nice!

At CR 11/MR 4, the fellow on the cover, the famous nuckelavee can use its mythic power to double the range of its aura, and yes, it may spoil potions or food within its aura. Its signature mortasheen disease requires mythic magic to cure, and may be rendered highly contagious by the creature. Additionally, for mythic power use, the nuckelavee’s mythic iteration may speed up the progress of the vile disease. In their wake, they spread filth and disease, rendering water difficult terrain, and the creature’s rancid odor touches those hit by bite or breath with a truly foul smell. AWESOME!

The CR 17/MR 7 death coach comes with a reprint of the mythic Lightning Stance and receives an upgrade to its soul-collecting abilities that make them truly devastating; epic here: The mythic iteration can take a standard action at any point during its movement, and may take an additional one for mythic power expenditure. The coach also gets the ability to trample through targets of any size, with the chance to frighten those failing or foregoing their saves. Those struck cower (OUC) on a failed save, and protection from fear may end up being dispelled by such attacks. More than all of this, non-good creatures that have their soul collected may strike a bargain with death, fulfilling a quest in exchange for their souls…AWESOME. I adore this build. It makes the ghost carriage really work, is deadly, and oozes narrative potential, even at lower levels. Where was this critter when my main campaign was in Ravenloft?

The highest CR/MR creature herein would be the CR 19/MR 7 Nemhain, who gets some DR/epic for better staying power and the means to upgrade the SPs to their mythic iterations. Speaking of which: Will-saves vs. effects that deal positive energy damage? Those behave as though the critter had a specialized form of evasion. As a standard action, the nemhain may return to the location of their ritual objects, and the ritual object, if destroyed, repels the living, for one more chance. Oh, and the object may be fortified by the nemhain’s mythic powers. As a full-round action and for one mythic power, they may attack all creatures (up to Dexterity-modifier) that damaged her. Then, there would be the bound spirits ability: The Nemhain is surrounded by swirling cloud of spirits that may be directed as a swift action to attack within a 30-ft.-radius, and they can deliver harm and similar effects. These may also be sent forth as scouts, as a kind of impervious cloud – reminded me of my slaver of the damned design in a good way! While they share the nemhain’s space, they btw. net concealment and SR. I love how this high-level threat is all about resistance and striking incredibly hard – this fellow won’t be easy to slay!

Now, as always, the book does contain a totally new creature that doesn’t exist yet – this time around, that would be the lavishly-illustrated Cyhyraeth, a tragic and mighty incorporeal undead that clocks in at CR 15/MR 6. These spirits get rejuvenation, DR, and natural invisibility. The staves they wield threaten critical hits on 19-20, and on a critical hit, they may demoralize the targets. A target demoralized for more than one round cowers for 1 round, and the cyhyraeth may expend mythic power to prolong that. When striking a creature with their staff, they can expend mythic power to affect the target with fog cloud, save that only the target sees the fog! Nasty! As a move action, these spirits may release a tri-fold moan of demise; on a failed save, targets then hear the subsequent moans, even if deaf. The first moan also provides a debuff and increases damage taken from melee and ranged weapon attacks; the second moan further increases the penalty and also provides an increased threat range versus those affected by the moan, while the third moan causes death. The horrifying thing: Hearing a moan is permanent. Unless the creature is destroyed, the moans will keep their potency indefinitely – or unless removed with very high-powered mythic magic. When they cause fear or death, these spirits can call will-o’-wisps to their side, and 1/day, they can curse locations or vessels with deadly accidents – 50% chance on natural 1s to take damage. Oh, and yeah, they have a heart grip that may knock targets out – and yep, this may be used in conjunction with the staff… A glorious masterpiece of a critter here!

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a rules-language level, and almost very good on a formal level; I noticed no serious hiccups, but a few cosmetic ones are here. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the original artworks presented are pure awesome. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Mike Welham and Jason Nelson are both true masters of creature-design, and its shows in this book, it really does. While the archetype left me less than blown away (I’d rate that, on its own, probably somewhere in the 3-4-star vicinity), the creatures, and that should be made abundantly clear, are all killer, no filler. There is not one mythic build herein that I wouldn’t vastly prefer over the original creature. This hold particularly true for the high-level creatures that actually have a chance of standing against mythic heroes, that all can carry their own adventures. They made me flash back, in the best of ways, to all those years upon years of Ravenloft-campaigns I ran, made me really stoked to run some gothic horror. So yeah, the series ends with a huge BANG, and not with a whimper – 5 stars + seal of approval.

On a personal side: I can’t believe I’ve reviewed 50 of these books. Tempus fugit, indeed. Anyways, I wanted to write something about it: The Mythic Monsters-series has redefined what I dare to expect from creatures, and what I frankly want to see from creature design. It represents a paradigm-shift away from solely new combinations of math, feats and spells/SPs, towards the mythological roots of the creatures, or, where not applicable, towards creatures that are set apart by unique abilities that make them stand out. They provide narrative potential beyond being stuff to be hacked apart, and present us with a great fusion of powerful crunch-skills and the narrative demands of, you know, ROLEplaying. If you haven’t checked it out yet, please do so. Even if you don’t run mythic campaigns, your veteran players will enjoy the challenge these magnificent monsters provide. I will genuinely miss reviewing this series and am grateful for all the joy it has brought to my table. I raise my stein to all the talented designers that crafted this outstanding series! Here’s to you!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Monsters #50: Celtic
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Mythic Treasures
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/14/2019 05:58:47

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This collection of mythic items clocks in at 56 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 47 pages, which, as always for Legendary Games, contain quite a lot of information, so let’s take a look!

This review as moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of my patreons.

All right, this book begins with a bit of advice regarding the use of mythic items in conjunction with nonmythic games and suggested rules for identifying them, before diving into legendary item abilities, 5 to be more precise: Inestimable beauty renders an item impervious and makes it behave as though it had an enhancement bonus of ½ tier. This one lets you use bardic performance (distraction/fascinate only) as a bard of your mythic tier level, with tier stacking with bard levels), and twice ranks for the purpose of using them. Legendary power may also be used to use enthrall or hypnotic pattern with a CL equal to HD + tier. Mighty servant lets the item assume the form of a Small or Medium construct, a Large form for legendary power, using a modified version of animated object stats, with the option to fortify it via mythic power expenditure.. Resonant regalia does what you’d expect – it provides a mechanical framework for the classic notion of multiple items in a set increasing power. Soul drinker can only be applied to weaponry, and does what it says on the tin, snuffing out lives and making it hard to return the slain to life. Soul safe, finally, reforms you body, lich-style, in the vicinity of the item when slain, and the item’s legendary power may be used to negate death effects etc.

After this, we get 4 new mythic armors: The cloudcloth armor is a padded armor that nets mistsight, allows for the assumption of mythic gaseous form, and it can also be used to force gaseous creatures into corporeal form or negate toxic gasses. Nice. The cuirass of miracles is a bolstering deathless determination armor made of elysian bronze, which is interested in that it enhances the determination ability and upgrades the breath of life effect to its mythic iteration. The armor may also store mythic surges, though storing these takes A LOT of downtime – thankfully. If the armor contains 7 surges, it gets an additional ability, which, while potent, will not be overused thus – it’s a last ace in the hole. Dragonmail is dragon-defiant energy resistance banded mail, applying the dragon defiant bonus universally to all dragons, but the armor does not provide flexible resistance; this is instead governed by the source-dragon’s hide. For mythic wearers, we also have the effects of evasion and a mythic power-based temporary improved evasion. Earthenport plate is a stoneplate engraved with mystic runes – these may be chanted to apply invulnerability, titan or wild temporarily to the armor; additionally, a different chant allows the wearer and surrounding area to soften stone etc., sink under, and teleport with all sunken-in characters to another place. This gets teleportation-blocking effects etc. right, and the armor is better for dwarves.

This section also provides the jawbone shield that is specifically designed to help against creatures with grab or Snatch – an AoO-shieldbash; 1/day, such a smash vs. a bite attack can temporarily wreck the fangs of a target. The mythic power/surge mechanics also interact neatly here. Minor complaint: The cost to create here has one number too much – the “0” noted should have been eliminated.

The pdf also contains 11 magic items: The blade-eating battleaxe is made from adamantine and can sunder multiple weapons at once, and parades/parries may trigger sunder assaults. There are three magic boomerangs included (one, comically, called boomerage in one of the funniest autocorrect typos I’ve seen in a while); these include a sharp boomerang that has an increased threat range and Constitution damage. It may be thrown in a buzzsaw-like 30-ft.-line for AoE-attacks; the second boomerang allows for ranged trips/feints and the use of other combat maneuvers. The third boomerang is all about ricocheting. Dauntless machete lets you move swiftly through natural difficult terrain, and even clear quickly magical plant-effects, and it can be used to become plant bane’d. Kinslayer’s knife helps you go Dalek-level “EXTERMINATE” regarding a bloodline -the keen kinslayer kukri allows the wielder to blood biography the wounded, and the name of the creature appears on the blade – really potent for games of intrigue, particularly since mythic power allows for the tracking down of relatives…ouch. Outback woomera is a spear-thrower club that may be used to enhance shortspears cast via it, and it also allows you to create magical foodstuffs.

Redflame trollblade is a mighty weapon created with an eye towards the destruction of trolls – and since it emits a long-range call, including a subliminal suggestion that compels trolls to seek out and attempt to destroy the wielder, it should come as no surprise that the blade gets enough use. Rokurokubi whips can transform their end into the screeching heads of the namesake monster, and alternatively act as a scarf and allow you to emulate the monster. Silverspark longbows were once created as means to hunt down evil witches and wizards, focusing on anti-caster tricks. Finally, there would be the tombo fan, a weapon that allows for flight in conjunction with bardic performances, including fluid turns.

4 rings are included, the first of them being the gauss ring, which can be sued to charge melee attacks or in grapples; rings of returning allow you to return to a destination after teleportation, a kind of failsafe; the ring of truth can really help inquisitors, but prevents lying…and the ring of warmth can be considered to be a kind of survival-angle in the cold regions out there. The book also features 4 different rods – the gnarlthorn rod doubles as a wounding Morningstar (or club) that also causes ability score damage alongside the options of using burst of nettles and similar plant-based effects. The pyroclastic rod allows for the creation of ash or volcanic storms, acting as a flaming light mace that can dispel cold effects; plus, it allows for entangling magma that may be hardened by cold damage. The rod of spell-focusing may be attuned to schools or the 4 core energy types and enhance the attuned spell effects…while the rod of defoliation allows you to go Dark Sun defiler.

The book also contains a massive selection of 31 (unless I’ve miscounted) mythic magic items that contain a who’s who of some of the greatest mythic items released by Legendary Games so far – the awesome yoke of the brazen bull and the classic witch’s broom may be found. Classic mythology gets its nods, the teeth of the hydra, and the oni mask, to note two. The hei tiki amulet and hei matau amulet are here, and magi will benefit particularly from the arcanamach’s vambraces, while prepared spellcasters will enjoy the book of the banned that allows for limited access to e.g. prohibited schools, acting as a great tool for complex investigations – my spellbook doesn’t have that spell! (The book can also be glamered and uses secret page…) From the crane kimono to the crown of iron sorcery and the diamond of everwinter, fans of Legendary Games will have a couple of smiles here. Errant’s gage are gloves that help with smite, challenge, etc.

Beyond those, we do also get a massive 16 different artifacts taken from legendary Games’ illustrious history – from the pirate queen’s pearl to the elder talisman, from the sacred scroll of language to the undead-horde assembling midnight beacon and the lucky mallet, from the golden fleece to the funerary pyramid, from fractured phylacteries to the good ole’ dimensional bomb and to the deva’s wings or the crescent blade of the green dragon, this book is a grand collection of awesome artifacts with proper mythic rule-interactions.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level, with the items often juggling very high-complexity concepts with panache. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf has a couple of full-color artworks that fans of LG will be familiar with – the cover of my copy looks a bit blurry, but the content and interior artwork etc. is as crisp as you’d expect. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Jason Nelson, Loren Sieg, Pedro Coelho, Matt Goodall, Linda Zayas-Palmer, Thurston Hillman and Alexander Augunas are an all-star team, and it shows here. While it should be noted that this is a kind of compilation (if you have as many LG-books as I do, there won’t be that much here for you); there is value in this book’s convenience of having a pretty massive selection of mythic items, all collected for your convenience instead of being spread out over a gazillion of different books. EDIT: I kinda assumed that to be a given, but to make the verbiage of my review clearer: This content is included in the Mythic Character Codex and Mythic Heroes Handbook, if you for example want only the items, this is definitely your go-to-place, and I applaud Legendary Games for providing a stand-alone version that allows the customers to have the option to get only the items, if desired. Full of cool ideas and resonant with myths, this is well worth 5 stars + my seal of approval; if you already own most LG-books, I’d instead advise in favor of getting the big books, though. Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Treasures
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Mythic Feats: Advanced Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/08/2019 05:20:26

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Mythic plugins provided by Legendary Games clocks in at 30 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of SRD (though one of these contains an artwork and Wounded Paw Gambit), 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 20 pages of content, though, as always for these books, it should be noted that there is quite a lot of text crammed into this supplement.

This review was moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of my patreons.

Now, as always, we get a metric ton of feats in this supplement – this time around, we cover all the feats that are included in the Advanced Class Guide. Organization-wise, we first get an alphabetical list, and then one that groups them by type. This is per se cool, but unlike some installments in the series, the first list is not internally hyperlinked.

All right, as always, I can’t go through all the 100+ feats in this supplement feat-by-feat without wrecking the utility of this review utterly; as such, my focus here will instead be to provide an overview of the material contained within. The mythic iteration of Aberrant Tumor allows you to choose any familiar allowed to wizards as tumor familiar, and said tumor familiar gets one alchemist discovery chosen from a list, with your level substituted for prerequisites. You gain the benefits of the discovery while the familiar is attached. Amateur Investigator nets you an investigator talent, Amateur Swashbuckler a limited array of panache points and a 3rd-level deed. Both have trade-in option available and the former does mention the caveats that take into account when a talent would require a base ability to modify – it’s not gained. Animal Soul optionally allows you to be affected by animal-targeting spells, and mythic power expenditure lets you affect your companion. Minor nitpick: Unlike in the big book, this one does miss an italicization here. This is not the only such minor formatting snafu herein: Believer’s Hands, for example, does not properly bold “Prerequisites” and “Benefit” – this one, just fyi, makes your character level act as paladin level, and nets you a mercy for every three tiers.

Anticipate Dodge provides knowledge of the target’s dodge bonus, as well as numerical escalation, adding ½ mythic tier to the base feat’s bonuses. Battle Cry is another example for such an escalation in numbers, doubling the bonuses granted, and allowing for the expenditure of mythic power to increase duration. Another such twist would be e.g. Befuddling Strike – here, we have a DC-increase as well as the option to use more than one per round. Finally, this one allows you to substitute mythic power expenditure for daily uses. Winter’s Strike also allows for the use of mythic power in that manner. Confounding Tumble Deed would be another example of such an option, as would Distracting Charge. Killing Flourish presents a neat example here: +1/2 tier to Intimidate, +full tier for one mythic power use.

Blasting Charge is a straight up damage increase, with double the increase available for mythic power expenditure, and there are quite a few of those: Canny Tumble or Coordinated Shot, to name two, provide a static bonus increase. The Jabbing Style feat tree provides a similar increase, save that here it pertains the size of bonus damage die employed – the Jabbing Dancer feat, however, allows for pretty free maneuverability within the reach of targets hit, which can be a godsend. Dual Enhancement is nice for TWFing characters, as it allows you to spend a use of mythic power to apply the special ability to the second weapon as well.

There are plenty of tactically more interesting options within as well: Channeled Blessing, for example, adds channel energy to the delivery of channeled blessings, and allows for the use of mythic power to extend the blessing’s effects – and, here’s the kicker, domains and revelations allow for the use in conjunction with this ability as well. The latter may just be a line, but it’s a big one. The mythic iteration of Barroom Brawler makes you count as both monk and fighter, with 8th and 10th level providing an additional combat feat at a given time. Blessed Striker makes your attacks also be treated as magic and epic. Disarming Threat Deed allows you in its mythic iteration to have the target remain indifferent for mythic power expenditure. Gruesome Slaughter provides a DC-increase, and similarly, Improved Awesome Blow provides an escalation of numbers. Surprise Maneuver nets you +1/2 tier to the maneuver check, Twist Away to Reflex saves – you get the idea.

Interesting and testament that the LG-crew is very much cognizant of the evolution of the game: Extra Arcanist Exploit, for example, allows you to poach psychic phrenic amplifications, alchemist discoveries, magus arcana or witch hexes, and Extra Inspiration lets you spend mythic power to replenish your inspiration pool if it’s empty – no, it can’t be cheesed. Extra Martial Flexibility nets you access to the mythic feat’s iteration as well and slayers get to choose material from the vigilante’s arsenal with Extra Slayer Talent. Kudos for not staying just within the design-paradigm of the books released up to and including the ACG! Indeed, such flexibility is a theme in more than one instance: Flexible Hex may be shifted an additional time per day; Flexible Wizardry allows for an additional spell to be prepared. Unfettered Familiar also gets an additional daily use.

Want to play a fanatic? With the mythic versions of Extreme Prejudice and Seething Hatred, you get d10 sneak attack dice and can spend mythic power for triple damage versus the targets of your hatred! Ouch! There are delimiters, like Improved Studied Combatant (bonus equals character level, no limits on how often per day a target may be affected), which act as means to provide a soft form of gestalting, which, considering the vast power of mythic gameplay, seems feasible.

Tactically really cool: Intercept Charge nets you a bonus to AC, which you may, per mythic power expenditure, apply versus all of that opponents attacks, making pounce etc. less of a painful proposal for the knights saving their squishy buddies. Lunging Spell Touch’s mythic iteration gets rid of the -2 penalty to AC versus the creature on a hit; for mythic power expenditure, the hit-clause drops away. Manifest Blood is intriguing, as it penalizes attacking creatures with negative conditions on a failed Fortitude save. Nice: Raging Absorption has an anti-abuse caveat for its bloodrage-replenishing effects.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are good, bordering on very good on a formal and rules-language level. There isn’t much to complain about herein. The pdf adheres to a two-column full-color standard, and the book features nice full-color artworks, most of which should be familiar to fans of Legendary Games. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Margherita Tramontano, Jason Nelson and Julian Neale have my utmost respect for this one. Making mythic feat upgrades can be rather hard work, and personally, there are few books where I’d consider that statement to be as true as the ACG. It’s no secret that I am not a fan of the Advanced Class Guide at the best of days; the book represents, to me a design dead-end, and one that thankfully was abandoned when Occult Adventures, Ultimate Intrigue etc. were released. That being said, there are plenty of components in the ACG that I do like and consider to be worth salvaging, and having the mythic upgrades done for me? Heck yeah, that’s a level of convenience I very much applaud. That being said, plenty of the base feats simply didn’t have that much to work with – where the options in the later books provided breadth that the Legendary Games-crew used to broaden the options further, the ACG is all about the escalation of numbers.

Bearing this in mind, and consulting the source material feats the designers had to work with, this book must be lauded as a success. While there isn’t as much in the ways of novel options or far-out new gambits, what this one has wrought from the often rather thin premises of the base feats certainly deserved to be applauded. This may not be my favorite in the series, sure – but a) that was to be expected, courtesy of the source materials, and b) it certainly is the one that I’m most happy about not having to do it on my own. ;)

All in all, I consider this to be a collection of upgrades worth owning, and thus, my final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Feats: Advanced Feats
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Legendary Fighters
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 05/06/2019 08:06:28

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of the Legendary Class-redesigns/supplements clocks in at a mighty 62 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of ToC, 4 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 51 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review was moved up in my reviewing queue as a prioritized review at the request of my patreon supporters.

This book is, in its structure, akin to the phenomenal Legendary Rogues, in that it begins with a closer examination and expansion of the fighter class features, intended to provide means to differentiate the fighter class from other classes. As such, the book begins by taking a look at the advanced weapon training options introduced in the Weaponmaster’s Handbook – these allow for the replacement of the weapon training class feature at 9th, 13th and 17th level, and may alternatively be accessed via the Advanced Weapon Training feat, which fighters may take multiple times, but only once per 5 class levels attained. An updated version of said feat is included within, as the feat no longer requires a clause for the weapon master archetype. 19 such options have been included within this book, with the first of them allowing for weapon training bonus to be applied on combat maneuver checks with a chosen maneuver. There is also a means to enhance CMD, increase the save DC, if any, of effects caused by critical hits, quicker intimidation (with Dazzling Display synergy and means to combo it with e.g. Cornugon Smash), etc. Nice if you’re like me and enjoy, style-wise, some weapons that damage-die wise are less impressive: With focused weapon, you get a somewhat monk-ish damage progression for a weapon of your choice that you have Weapon Focus for, and scale its damage based on level, with the small table provided covering Small and Large size categories as well.

Cool one: These also include the option to expend an attacks of opportunity as an immediate action to add weapon training bonus to the saving throw, excluding ongoing magical effects; spell sundering and dispelling can also be found, and these two are not only mechanically great, they help make the fighter more viable and fun in high-magic contexts. Dexterity bonus to attack and Strength bonus to damage with thrown weapons as well as doubled weapon training bonus can be helpful as well – a helpful table sums these up, as well as their source, notes name-changes, if any, and we do get some guidance regarding implementation as well – big plus.

The next section pertains Weapon mastery feats, with Martial Focus as a specifically denoted gateway feat for non-fighters – and this feat is listed in the beginning, set apart with a shaded background. It may be a small thing, but seeing this one not hidden amidst a ton other feats made me smile from ear to ear – it’s really consumer-friendly and didactically-sensible presentation. Adaptive Counterstrike and Trade Blows, both with their own combat tricks, are included. Adaptive Counterstrike deserves special mention here: It’s the single best “analyze enemy”-type of feat I’ve seen in ages, and it doesn’t require wonky attack roll comparisons. Mechanically a boon for sore eyes. Trade Blows is similarly genius, making readied actions matter and allowing you to really harry targets. There may just be these two here, but quality trumps quantity any day of the week, and both of these are gamechangers. Speaking of making sense: If you’ve been adamant about playing by the book, you will have noticed weapon groups and associated lists being spread across different sources, including a blog post – well, fret not, for this book collects them in a sensible manner in one proper place. This is, once more, a thing that you may not immediately be stoked about, but the diligence that collected this list is something I genuinely applaud. And yes, there is a ginormous list that notes them all by source and whether or not they agree, allowing you to resolve conflicts of interpretation swiftly without having to resort to asking on the boards. This is amazing, very much the definition of going the extra mile.

You’ve probably seen it coming, so the presence of advanced armor training options probably is what you expected to see. However, what you probably did NOT expect to see, is that we begin with an analysis of the class feature, as the book highlights the issues and potentially rather limited appeal of this class feature. The ability also ranges in the power its component offers, and as such, the class feature is divided into two selectable pieces that no longer strand you with components of a class feature you simply can’t make use of. A total of 20 different armor training options may be found within this book, once more, like for the weapon training options, sporting the handy table that notes changes at one glance – for example for quick donning, or for unmoving, which now lets you select two different maneuvers. The section does, once more, come with an implementation guideline provided. Armor Focus, as an Armor Mastery feat, is included, and for your convenience, a massive table of such applicable feats, including sources, once more greatly helps navigating the breadth of options out there. At this point, the book has already a serious edge, as it acts as a brilliant reference book for fighter options.

From there on out, we move on to perseverance, which is the term employed for defensive resilience abilities; unless I’ve miscounted, there are 16 of these inside, and yes, e.g. bravery can be found here; this mean s that e.g. employing the content herein in conjunction with Michael Sayre’s Bravery Feats is very much possible. These features replace the armed bravery, and implementing them as the CRB bravery feature is an easy to grasp and super simple way of inciting players to remain in the fighter class instead of classing out of it. Additionally, the sequence in which these options are gained mirror the progression intervals of other fighter features, which generates a pleasant symmetry. …don’t judge me, I can’t help it! I really like seeing symmetry and elegance in design, and this renders the fighter more pleasing from a rules-aesthetic point of view. Perhaps I’m weird, but in case you’re like me in that regard, I figured you’d like to know that. On the other side of things, while I never will become a huge fan of stalwart mettle (basically evasion for Fort- and Will-saves), it ultimately won’t break the game when made available to the fighter.

The next option array provided would be “Prowess” – these options represent the fighter’s meta-feats, which enhance combat feats, provide skill-based options, etc. – as the book correctly notices, there is a fine line between prowess and advanced weapon training options – but thankfully, the table does list such options with an asterisk, noting that they may be taken as either. It’s nice to see that the book doesn’t simply leave that aspect up to the GM and provides apt guidance. 21 such options are included for your convenience, and allow the fighter to gain skills and no longer be the dumb and useless brute outside of combat; there is an option for proficiency in an entire weapon group, a means for allies to share the fighter’s teamwork feats and options that render Style feat use more viable: Style Training lets you always be in one style and enter them as a free action, and Style Mastery lets you use more than one style feat simultaneously. The implementation of these options is explained analogue to the previous option categories – 4th level and every 4 levels thereafter are suggested, and detailed corner case rulings prevent confusion with e.g. Barroom Brawler. And yes, if you’ve always been irked by the fighter’s bad saves, there is an easy to implement optional rule/variant here. And while I noticed this before, you have probably guessed it at this point – this massive tome of fighter tweaks also provides the means to make the fighter less feat-starved.

Another issue that many a player has encountered, would be the requirement to invest in tertiary ability scores to meet the prerequisites of certain feats, and, you guessed it, the book does offer solutions for this, and contextualizes the fighter anno 2018 with other classes and their means to waive certain prerequisites and the like. I absolutely ADORE the concept of latent feats: Feats you’ve retrained, but which still count for the purpose of prerequisites. At 4th level, this suggested class feature is perfectly placed to avoid dipping-abuse and regarding when, during a fighter’s career, feats like Mobility or Dodge start becoming dead weight. Once more, a potential issue of the fighter can be resolved in a smooth and elegant way. (And no, they can’t be abused.)

Fighter-specific feats get their own table, with (Greater) penetrating Strike and Clustered Shots having their effects listed in a handy table – and once more, the reference table can be worth its weight in gold when planning your fighter. The book goes beyond that, retuning e.g. the gloves of dueling to work smoothly in conjunction with the massive option array presented. There are alternate rules here that render fighters still somewhat capable when employing nonproficient weapons, options that fortify weapons gripped by these martial masters, not dropping held weapons when panicked or stunned…nice. As an aside: One of my last campaign’s PCs, a super-high-powered gladiator-type, ALWAYS managed to fail saves versus dragons, losing multiple unique magic weapons this way, so yeah, these may not look like much, but they certainly do matter! The book then proceeds to present optional alternate rules for high-level fighters, like moving up to his speed before or after a full attack (making the fighter less static), not automatically missing on a natural 1, 1/round treating an attack roll as a 10 at 19th level…yeah.

So far, so good – a colossal grab-bag of fighter options to customize the class. Beyond that, we have the Legendary Fighter, who gets d10 HD, 4 + Intelligence modifier skills per level, proficiency with all simple and martial weapons as well as armor and shields, including tower shields, full BAB-progression and good Fort-saves. 1st level and every even levels thereafter net a bonus feat, and the fighter can choose 4 skills from a list to be added to the list of class skills, representing the skill-upgrade design paradigm mentioned before. The legendary fighter also takes the save-issue into account: He gets sharp reflexes, which nets +1 to Reflex saves, which further improves by +1 at 5th level and every 6 levels thereafter. 2nd level nets +1 to Will saves, which increases by another +1 at 10th level. The legendary fighter treats his ability scores as +1/2 class level higher for the purpose of meeting feat prerequisites starting at 2nd level, and 3rd level adds +1/3 class level to BAB for the purposes of prerequisites, capping at +5. Also at 3rd level, we have an advanced weapon training, with an additional one gained at 7th, 11th and 15th level. Also at 3rd level, the fighter may don the more problematic heavy armors sans aid and gains advanced armor training options at 5th, 9th and 13th level. Also at third level, we have a +1 bonus to atk and damage with all proficient weapons, and to combat maneuver checks executed with said weaponry and to CMD versus weapon targeting maneuvers. The bonus increases by +1 at 7th, 11th and 15th level.

4th level implements aforementioned feat-retraining options, including the genius latent feats engine, and also introduces prowess options. Proper weapon grip, aforementioned high-level skirmishing option – at this point you have noticed it, right? Yep, this class is basically the result of implementing all those modular class features in a concise manner. And here is where the book once more walks the extra mile that separates a good or very good book from an excellent one – it starts talking about archetype use in conjunction with the legendary fighter, providing concise and easy to grasp guidelines to use them in conjunction with the class, including how to deal with underpowered archetypes, with redundant abilities, etc. And guess what: Yes, we do get a HUGE table of archetypes, with sources listed and modifications noted. Want to play a pack mule legendary fighter? Just check the table. A.W.E.S.O.M.E.!

If your system mastery at this point is rather pronounced, you’ll know that e.g. armor master, lore warden, unbreakable or weapon master require some more love, right? Well, guess what: This book covers them in detail. Oh, and the pdf offers “simple” archetypes – these present the last tools you need to make this engine slot in seamlessly with pretty much anything: Exotic weapon wielders, living weapons, stamina adherents, spirit warriors – ALL ARE COVERED.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are top-notch on a formal and rules-language level. Layout adheres to a 2-column full-color standard, with most artworks being classics that fans of Legendary Games will be familiar with. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

I won’t lie, I did not really look forward to reviewing this fighter-rebuild. I have read more than my share of them, and e.g. Alexander Augunas’ Unchained Fighter sated my thirst for a Stamina-bar-based fighter rather aptly.

Here’s the thing: Matt Goodall’s Legendary Fighter does not seek to become a competition for that class, and they actually work rather smoothly in the same campaign, offering different playing experiences.

More than just a class, though, this is basically the “Teach you how to make the fighter awesome”-book. Instead of presuming to be aware of all realities of tables out there, this book takes the ultimate high-road: It presents awesome rules, and explains the consequences of their implementation, the design rationale behind them, allowing the customer to make informed decisions regarding the implementation of all modified class features herein. This is a GIGANTIC plus, and in an ideal world, would be the standard. Let’s say you’re playing a Greyhawk-like campaign, with an emphasis of gritty low magic, and you’re actually happy with how the fighter works – for the most part. Your group doesn’t need too much tactical finesse and doesn’t feature much minmaxing, but the skill situation sucks, and so does the save stuff. Great, you can read this book, make an informed decision and just include these components! On the other side of the spectrum, veteran number-crunchers and connoisseurs of diverse options finally get a fighter class that is on par with more recent releases, that has a vast plethora of unique tools at its disposal, and that is rewarding and versatile to play. From latent feats to the small details, this oozes care and a genuine love for the fighter, one that translates into a master-class supplement.

Oh, a supplement that also represents a massive reference tome that helps you navigate the intricacies of PFRPG. From magic items to archetypes, this does not simply slam down great content – it provides the content, sure. But it also explains in a didactically-sensible manner why and how these design decisions have been made. This book, in a way, is a guideline for you to emancipate, in the Kantian sense, the fighter class, making it what YOU think it should be. Oh, and even if design and tinkering are not things that catch your interest, guess what – the Legendary Fighter, as the whole-deal comfort package has you covered.

This is a master-class book, even when looked at within the context of this series’ exceedingly high standards. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars + seal of approval, and, you’ve probably seen it coming, this is a candidate for my Top Ten of 2018. Don’t wait – finally make the fighter class that fits your game!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Fighters
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Mythic Feats: Wilderness Feats
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/29/2019 04:24:48

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Mythic Feat-upgrades clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 23 pages of content, though, as always, for Legendary Games, there is a ton of text per page.

This review was moved up in my reviewing-queue at the request of my patreons.

Organization-wise, this pdf starts off strong, offering feat-lists in alphabetical order, and then provide a list of feats organized by type, providing for all organization-paradigms you may prefer – big plus. The first list is even internally hyperlinked, allowing for comfortable navigation of the electronic iteration of this pdf.

As always, this book does something I really respect: It takes the feats from one of Paizo’s big hardcovers, here, obviously, Ultimate Wilderness, and provides mythic iterations – for ALL OF THEM. As such, covering each and every feat would obviously bloat this review beyond any usefulness, so let’s start by providing an overview and some samples from within, shall we?

The first feat within is Ambush Awareness, and the mythic iteration allows you to expend a mythic power when benefiting from Ambush Awareness to take a single action instead of a total defense action. Animal Call allows you to add your mythic tier to Bluff checks (not properly capitalized; there are quite a few instances of skills not properly capitalized; btw. not the only feat where a skill hasn’t been properly capitalized herein), and if you succeed, you may call ALL animals within 100 ft. of the type you called, which is pretty epic. Design paradigm-wise, we do have a couple of instances, where the use of mythic power allows for numerical escalation – Animal Ferocity allows for the addition of a +5 circumstance bonus to attack rolls, for example, and Beast Hunter would be another nice example of this design paradigm. The Ferocious feats to upgrade animal companions allow for the addition of mythic tier to the Bluff skills made to feint or intimidate checks made to demoralize, and both allow for the use of these as a swift action; the demoralize-based, in a nice catch, also allows for Anatagonize use in conjunction with this.

With the proper mythic Verdant Spell, you can affect plant creatures and sentient creatures at once, and when specifically targeting only plants, you penalize Will saves for spell level rounds. Additionally, mythic power allows for the spontaneous use of metamagic. Voice of Beasts’ mythic iteration nets you a non-dispellable supernatural speak with animals. With Boon Companion’s mythic iteration, you can use the full character level as druid level to determine animal companion/familiar abilities, and Command Animals or Command Plants follow a similar design paradigm. Branch Pounce’s upgrade allows you to mitigate the consequences of missing the attack, and similarly, Deep Diver helps you reduce falling damage when diving, and also doubles your range of vision while underwater, which is a cool touch. Mythic power can fortify you against the rigors of crushing pressure as well. With the Bristling combat maneuver feats, you can increase damage output by tier, and has options to use mythic power for more damaging assaults.

Really interesting from a tactical perspective – Crashing Wave Style’s upgrade makes movement taken as part of drag/reposition not count against the amount of movement per round, with mythic power as a means to increase the number of squares. Similarly, Flinging Charge allows you to choose to take the -5 penalty on the ranged attack made as part of the charge instead of the melee attack. Additionally,, when hitting the target of the charge with the ranged attack, you deny the target Dexterity bonus to AC for the melee attack to follow. Now, personally, I do not think that this should allow, as written herein, for a 3/day regaining of mythic power when confirming a critical hit with the ranged attack, as this can theoretically allow you to exceed the standard cap.

Clinging Climber may be used as a swift action, even as a free action with mythic power expenditure. The complex Eidolon Mount upgrade allows you to maintain the eidolon’s size if it’s more than one size category larger than you. Energized Wild Shape’s mythic version increases energy resistance, and also nets a minor retributive energy when struck by unarmed strikes, etc. Exotic Heritage allows you to take 10 or 20 while threatened with the skill chosen for the base feat, and when using the feat to gain the benefits of Eldritch Heritage, the character also gets the 3rd-level bloodline power, at character level-2. Group Shared Spell allows you to cast targets with a target of “you” on any character that has this feat, with mythic power even at close range – and yes, this is basically one of the few teamwork feats that is really potent, and one that your allies WILL want to invest the feat in!

Obviously, we also cover the Improved/Greater Hunter’s Bond, Spring Attack, etc. feat-upgrades, and e.g. the Indomitable Mountain Style chain is also nice. Jaguar Pounce’s mythic iteration allows you to combine the benefits with Improved Critical, and charge/Spring Attack allows you to inflict tier-governed additional damage: I really enjoyed the power-upgrades for Natural Poison Harvester and Antitoxin. Out of the Sun allows you to blind targets, and Reflexive Interception’s mythic feat nets the character evasion (and its improved version), whether the companion succeeds on the save or not. Shifter’s Edge allows for the threat range increase via mythic power for 1 minute, and increases Shifter’s Edge bonus damage by adding mythic tier to class level to determine damage. Totemic Discipline nets uncanny dodge or the upgraded iteration, and barbarian level for the totemic feats is equal to character level.

The Wilding feat chain also deserves mentioning, as we for example have mythic wild empathy here, immediate action ending of mind-affecting effects, becoming confused instead.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are between good and very good on a formal level – the glitches I found were mostly aesthetic in nature. Rules language-wise, this is as refined and precise as we’ve come to expect from Legendary Games at this point. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf sports quite an array of full-color artworks, which will be familiar to fans of Legendary Games. The pdf is internally hyperlinked, and the pdf comes properly bookmarked for your convenience.

Alex Riggs, Margherita Tramontano, Jonathan H. Keith, Jeff Lee – you have my utmost respect. Designing books like this can be WORK, and honestly, it’s one thing I personally wouldn’t want to do. For that alone, this series has to be applauded. The work that goes into these mythic feat books is palpable. Now, I am a bit spoiled by now – this particular iteration does go a bit more into the direction of depth regarding the escalation of numbers, rather than providing breadth of new options, though it should be noted that there are plenty of options herein that do represent tactical gamechangers. All in all, this renders the book a great, if not perfect upgrade of feats, one definitely worth getting if you’re using Ultimate Wilderness, and a must-have when using Ultimate Wilderness in conjunction with Mythic Adventures – hence, my final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded down.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Mythic Feats: Wilderness Feats
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Path of the Bound
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/05/2019 05:12:18

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This mythic plug-in clocks in at 32 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages introduction/how to use, 1 page ToC, 3 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 20 pages of content, though it should be noted that there is a ton of information crammed into these pages.

This review was moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of one of my patreon supporters.

So, turns out that not all heroes gain their mythic power by their own deeds and might; some achieve their potent powers by means of Faustian bargains, oaths of fealty and the like – these are the Bound. (So yeah, from good ole’ Faust to Preussler’s Krabat to Arthur’s knights, there are plenty examples of folks that could have been Bound.) The main focus here is on clerics, oracles, mediums, shamans, summoners and witches. The path nets 3 bonus hit points per tier and at first tier, gets the bound pact ability, which manifests in one of four abilities, 3 of which may be activated as a swift action. Eldritch wish lets the Bound expend a use of mythic power to cast a spell or SP sans expending the spell slot or prepared spell. Material and focus components must still be provided, and the spell is limited by the spell lists it can be from, and the spell level must be equal to or less than the mythic tier, using mythic tier instead of casting ability modifier to determine DCs, if any. The second ability lets you, when you strike a creature within 30 ft. with an attack, expend a use of mythic power to mark them with a painful brand. The target takes a -1 penalty to all saves for mythic tier rounds, and this penalty increases by 1 at 5th and 10th tier, respectively.

Additionally, once per round when the branded creature takes damage, you may increase the damage caused as a free action by your mythic tier. When enhancing your own attacks or effects, you instead increase the damage by 1d6, +1d6 for every 3 tiers after 1st. The bonus damage is not multiplied on a critical hit. Step between, the third ability, allows you to expend a use of mythic power to move up to 50 ft. per tier in any direction, and upon reappearing, you are shrouded in a blur effect, and until the start of your next turn,. You get an attack at your highest BAB, against which the target is considered to be flat-footed. The ability requires line of effect. The wardpact ability may be used as an immediate action, and allows you to curse the originator of a harmful effect or attack that targets you; the penalty of the curse applies to e.g. AC, attack rolls, CL checks or concentration, depending on your preference, and the curse lasts for tier round and allows for a Will save to decrease its duration. The penalty increases for every 3 tiers.

The capstone tier ability, true pact, lets you, whenever you target a creature with a spell, SU or SP that requires a Will save, and the target fails the save, you may expend one use of mythic power (here erroneously referred to as “point of mythic power”) to treat the target as under the effects of a geas/quest.

The pdf of course contains a significant array of 1st-tier abilities, which cover a lot of ground, some of which allow for multiple choices: Take e.g. bound aspect, which allows you to choose either the ability to assume a Hyde-like monstrous physique; another choice nets you light and skin covered in scripture that enhances your skills, and a third aspect is one that nets you an idealized version of yourself. All of these share additional tricks that the choices have in common. Zon-Kuthon/kyton-themed characters will love the path ability that nets not only proficiency with whips and spiked chains (and counting as having Weapon Focus for e.g. Whip mastery; spiked chains may be wielded as chains, and the ability also allows for the expenditure of mythic power t enhance properties of the weaponry. Did anyone say “Spawn”?

There is an ability that makes an outsider come to claim your soul when you die (including making them come); there also would be an ability to seal supernatural contracts, and e.g. a cooperative casting trick, the ability to wield cursed items sans being affected by them, the ability to use mythic power to count as an alignment of your choice for the purposes of alignments and effects, making you a moral chameleon. Being a ´dream trader with hollow dreamscapes, transferring wounds, exorcisms, brief flashes of tapping into omniscience…and there is one that makes you appear as a headless horseman. Do you notice something? Yeah, the themes this time around are distinctly and strongly geared towards both dark fantasy and occult themes. The abilities, from looking like a reincarnated hero to the aforementioned array, do provide a surprising amount of narrative options. You’ll be hard-pressed to find even a single path ability herein that doesn’t have some compelling ad potentially inspiring angle. Of course, mythic companions and hexes and mechanical tricks like that are included as well. Did I mention the one that makes you a dislocated relic of a bygone age, Out of Time? From a roleplaying perspective, this really kicks it up a notch, even in contrast to other mythic paths presented by Legendary Games so far.

There would also be patron-related stuff, the ability to convert targets to your cause (including vow-engine synergy and e.g. Vow of Obedience/Truth reprints), the ability to use stigmata…you’re starting to see what I mean, right?

Among the 3rd tier abilities, we can find a really cool one – a free action ability that allows you to forge a retributive bond with adversaries, allowing you to counter mythic power expenditure! Very cool! Retributive curse strikes, flight, temporary hit point shields and more may be found here. (As an aside – there are a few more of the erroneous mythic point-references among the abilities – not many, and they’re purely cosmetic, but yeah.). Eye of vengeance ties in with judgments, and allows for retributive gazing through defenses and illusions, assuming negative conditions on allies, sin-eater style, the ability to alter binding agreements (OHHH, NASTY!)…and did I mention the headless horseman upgrade that lets you go full-blown Ghost rider? Oh yeah! What about the ability that lets you revive from the dead after a few years, also passing a hereditary curse on those that harmed you? Now this is some “cackle with glee”-material! Cool and creepy in a subtle manner – there is also the option to purify targets…first of diseases and the like, and then, of genetic impurities…which can have some genuinely disturbing repercussions in the hands of zealots…

The 6th level path abilities include forging a minor artifact, the potential for mythic power theft, imbuing companions with mythic power…and what about using multiple uses f mythic power to defy destiny itself? Low-level SP infinite spellcasting is per se nice, but should specify that it doesn’t cover all types of spells…otherwise we have an unrepentant infinite healing option here. Granted, 6th tier…but still.

The pdf also includes 3 different mythic flaws (one of which ties in with the corruption-engine) and then goes on to present mythic patronage rules: With the Mythic Patron feat (, yep, included, not capitalized properly), there is an option to bestow tiers on targets, receive them, and the rules for reclaiming mythic power is similarly concisely presented. So yeah, if you wanted to be Arthur and have your own champions – there you go!. This part of the engine is also supplemented by a 3rd-tier universal ability (to call protégés that you bestowed mythic power upon), and a trickster ability for blinking.

The final page offers some pieces of advice and suggestions for rewarding bound builds.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are excellent on a rules-integrity side of things; on a formal level, there are a couple of aesthetic deviations, with only rarely something negatively (and admittedly, circumstantially) influencing the integrity of the game. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf uses a mixture of new full color artwork and pieces that Legendary Games-fans will be familiar with. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Jason Nelson, Robert Brookes, David N. Ross, Clinton J. Boomer – with these stars among designers, it should come as no surprise that I consider this mythic path the by far coolest one released so far. With a deft focus of blending high-concept, cool abilities with relevant rules, the Path of the Bound could, on its own, arguably can carry a whole campaign. The mythic patronage section may be worth getting this all on its own – I could picture e.g. such mythic pacts as the sole source of magic in an otherwise gritty rare/low fantasy world, or as a central leitmotif for an occult/horror campaign. I love this supplement to bits. While I probably should round down from my final verdict of 4.5 stars, I just can’t bring myself to doing so. The abilities are simply too evocative, too amazing and inspiring. Hence, my final verdict will round up, and yes, this does get my seal of approval – highly recommended if your aesthetic preferences are even remotely close to mine!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Path of the Bound
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Path of the Mystic
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/05/2019 05:10:09

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This mythic path clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of how to use/introduction, 1 page ToC, 3 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 17 pages of content, though, as always, it should be noted that there is a lot of content per page.

This review was moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of my patreon supporters.

All right, the mystic path is specifically geared towards use with the occult classes, as well as characters like shaman and witch and characters inclined towards the occult. The mythic path nets 3 hit points per tier, and the mythic path starts off with presenting a choice between 4 different base abilities: Three of them may be activated as a swift action- compelling influence lets you expend mythic power to enhance your social skills with a number of creatures dependent on tier. Kinetic barrage allows for a simple blast sans infusions – this doesn’t provoke AoOs and you get tier to your BAB. This bonus blast, to warrant the mythic power expenditure, bypasses DR and energy resistances; nonmythic targets don’t even get the benefits of energy immunity. The third one allows for the casting of psychic spells sans spell slot or spell prepared expenditure; it must be of a spell level you know, but don’t have to have the spell prepared or known; CL is +2 for the purposes of level-dependent effects. The fourth ability can be used as an immediate action, and nets you reflexive incorporeal state and DR 10/epic. Cool ones!

The capstone is the same geas/quest trick the Path of the Bound has – including the mythic point guffaw. All right, but we’re here for the path abilities, right? Adamantine mind may be found alongside e.g. the ability to enhance the protection/magic circle tricks that make them binding traps – occultists will like this. They will like even more the ability to reassign points of mental focus imbued in implements. Speak with haunts plus being able to call upon spirits sans being in the right locale will be super helpful for mediums, and there is an option to tap into and form a collective unconsciousness that acts a bit like a collective, including the mythic power-based for the transfer of e.g. mesmerist tricks, phrenic pool points and the like – and yes, this has the rules precision to avoid being easily cheesed. The ability to wield cursed items from the Path of the Bound makes its appearance here as well. The pdf does include a path ability that nets you a crazy-prepared ability, including means to carry more and conceal items – alas, the ability does not have the caveat to make it impossible to retrieve specific items like keys for a particular lock, etc.

Kineticists can choose a second element, but you only get the element’s simple blast and basic utility wild talent. Furthermore, non-instantaneous kineticist abilities can be made harder to dispel. Exorcism makes a return alongside the archmage’s flash of omniscience. Forbidden writings is pretty cool, in that it nets you access to a whole assortment of Linguistics-themed SPs (italicizations missing); a couple of path abilities interact rather nicely with haunts et al. Better insight bonuses, fast power gathering, better defenses for the spiritualist’s phantom and more straight mythic upgrades for occult class features may be found as well. Did I mention more occult skill unlock uses per day, or the ability that allows for the synergy of occult class abilities and mythic abilities. Second chances after blundered social skill use, critical hit retribution and getting abilities from paths that correspond with the respective spirits may also be found. A better, spontaneous memory sharing option can also be found here.

The 3rd tier abilities include the ability to shut off your mind from madness, which is amazing – it is potent, but also makes it impossible for you to perceive e.g. critters with the [mythos] descriptor or similarly disturbing monstrosities. Being able to act in a time stop is also possible (italicization of spell reference missing, though), as is being a member of a well-connected esoteric order. Combining power gathering with elemental body that increases in potency depending on the number of rounds gathering, being anathema to ghosts and the like …and what about better chakra use, or gaining at-will SPs while near haunts…what about using garish appearances to draw attention, or being expert counterfeiters, two angles particularly mesmerists will like? There also is a means to specialize in psychic duels, switching spirits, splitting phantom between manifested and in the consciousness…some neat ones here.

Among the 6th tier abilities, there would be the means to use mythic power to negate the effects of failed mind-affecting effects, but it makes you controlled by the mythic patron. Odd here: The mystic doesn’t necessarily have a mythic patron, so this may come off as a bit confused. There is an ability to use telekinetic powers to use rock catching/throwing. Kineticists can learn to become living blasts of searing energy, while another ability allows for the transformation into pure thought, explicitly bypassing teleportation hindrance. The path also has an ability that lets you create a spiritual echo to take the brunt of an attack and redirect this.

The pdf concludes with a page of build/concept-advice pieces that help use this path.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are good on a formal and rules-language level, but not as tight as usual for Legendary Games – there are more hiccups in italicized components that aren’t, etc., than I’d care to see. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf comes with full color artwork, some of which is new, while other pieces will be familiar to fans of Legendary Games. Baffling: The pdf lacks bookmarks, which is a serious comfort-detriment for a book of this density.

Jason Nelson, Robert Brookes and David N. Ross are veterans that know what they do – the book manages to juggle highly complex concepts, and while more mechanic in the focus than the excellent Path of the Bound, the mystic will be a path that occult classes will certainly embrace. That being said, on a formal level, the pdf is a bit rushed, less refined than usual. The amount of missed italicizations is somewhat jarring, and the lack of bookmarks is baffling. Don’t get wrong – the rules integrity is still far beyond the average, and ultimately, it is what makes me round up from my final verdict of 3.5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Path of the Mystic
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Legendary Beginnings: Crisis at Falling Spring Station
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 04/04/2019 05:46:22

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This module clocks in at 56 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages SRD, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of introduction, 2 pages of advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 46 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

First things first: While this is nominally written for Beginner’s Box-rules, it works perfectly fine with the full PFRPG-rules. As for the age-bracket this is intended for, I’d suggest a starting age of about 8+; depending on how sensitive kids are, it may or may not require older kids: Personally, I consider it to be a kid-friendly module, provided the kids liked e.g. Harry Potter or the Lord of the Rings movies, there should be no issues. As for adult players, rest assured that this is perfectly suitable for adults! This is, in short, perfect for family game night, with sidebars offering advice on some scenes throughout the adventure.

The module is situated in the kingdom of Threll, and is intended for a well-rounded 2nd level party.

All righty, this being an adventure-review, the following discussion contains SPOILERS. Potential players will want to jump ahead to the conclusion.

… .. .

All right, only GMs around? Great! On the side of the Westmarch Moountains opposite from Threll, there is a wild land between the mountains and the Darkvale forest; in this wild region, a half-ogre named Carl has taken control of an array of goblins and gnolls – and his ambitions, his dreams, range further than being a local warlord. He wants a base of operations, dreaming the dream of conquerors, of emperors. This is where the border (-lands) fort Falling Spring Station comes into play.

Too well-defended to be taken by force, the ogre-blooded leader hatched a devious plan, using his goblin druid Groultooth to negotiate with local fey to afflict the humans with a horrid disease, the crumbling sickness, which may only be cured with a special draught. This disease makes the targets take Strength damage (ability score reference once not properly capitalized) and potentially causes confusion-like effects, which obviously does not help defending a fortified structure. (As an aside – this could be used to teach, in a playful manner, how to deal with relatives struck by neuro-degenerative diseases…but I digress.) The vile goblin has, via trickery, managed to place a collar on the fey queen’s daughter, bluffing the fey and thus forcing them to help wreck the defenses of the mortals. It is into this somewhat dire situation that the PCs stumble into: The fort has been struck by the crumbling sickness, and the invisible fey have wrecked all kinds of havoc in their last assault. The overland section is presented in a full-color hex map, and via one of a few hooks, the PCs are tasked to look after Falling Spring Stations and resolve the issues that haunt the place. When they do arrive, they’ll see their work cut out for them – Falling Spring Station burns!

The first encounter already does something clever – a fey-magic concealed pit trap, which, while painful, not likely to be lethal, establishes fey trickery from the get-go, and the fully-mapped station offers a variety of clues for the PCs to unearth. Obviously, the fire will need to be dealt with, and once that’s done, the PCs get a modular array of tasks as they investigate the fort and help the locals deal with the issues – like the need to gather fresh water due to the well being out of commission, a patrol missing, etc. – these tasks are refreshingly nonlinear, and small clues that the PCs can find along the way will help them slowly determine the culprits. Getting the ingredients to heal the crumbling sickness is also part of the deal, btw. During these encounters, the PCs meet a ball-tailed wampus (gorgeously illustrated, fyi), a great cat tricked by fey magics – and like in a good family-oriented module, clever players have a chance to resolve meeting the predator in a variety of non-violent ways. Big plus: Nonviolent combat-resolution is worth MORE XP than simply slaying the critter, thus rewarding compassionate playstyles. Kudos!

Not all encounters may be avoided thus – a violent moss troll, for example, is not asking for quarter, nor is a snallygaster, but then again – this is a fantasy game, and there are bound to be some monsters. A missing patrol has gone completely bonkers and makes for an absurd encounter, considering themselves a weird sort of adventuring hierarchy. The sidebars suggest optionally using meta-commentary when playing them, which can potentially work, depending on your playstyle. Personally, I found that the ridiculous nature of folks considering themselves royalty when clad in rags, acting in a pompous manner, does suffice. The patrol should be returned home subdued and alive, if possible… (As an aside: This encounter, obviously, can be used to teach something about status, behavior patterns, etc.)

At the end of this first section of the module, the PCs should have managed to assemble the evidence collected throughout its sandboxy bits, which clearly points towards the fey – from confronting spring-heeled jack and Jili the grig (lol), the PCs can find fey flowers galore – like “Dazies”. Or Foxglove Flares. AWESOME and yep, these flowers are presented in a concise and fun manner. Did I mention the flying giant fey toad (hilariously illustrated, btw.)? When the PCs manage to get the audience with fey royalty, they’ll be pointed towards aforementioned goblin druid…who is surprisingly pragmatic and unwilling to throw his life away. Clever PCs can make his fess up to his bluff and negotiate getting some information from the goblin. With the fey princess freed, the PCs will receive a banquet in their honor, including the means to ask the fey for their aid, for they may not give it unbidden. (And yes, the read-aloud text does make it VERY obvious when the PCs should ask…)

Now, the goblin’s confessions did include a dire warning – Carl’s legions are approaching, and thus, when the PCs return to Falling Spring Station, they will have time to prepare the fort and fortify it further for the assault of the ogre-kin warlord’s hordes. Suggestions for defensive ideas are provided with suggested sample skills and DCs assigned. Two different (stackable) initial encounters, and a variety of different, secondary ones, the finale is a pretty nice, free-form attack that handles mass combat and the like in the background, without requiring much GM-prowess; in the end, the PCs, of course, will need to stop Carl himself!

Conclusion: Editing and formatting is excellent on a rules-language level, and slightly less refined on a formal one – there are a few typo-level minor hiccups, and e.g. an instance where the blank spaces in one line have been swallowed during layout, but these do not impede the module’s functionality. Layout adheres to the Legendary Beginnings’ series neat two-color full color standard, and the pdf sports a mixture of nice original full-color artwork and a few pieces fans of Legendary Games will already be familiar with. Cartography is a bit of a weak point for the module – while the maps included are nice and full-color, no player-friendly, unlabeled versions are included, which is a bit annoying, considering that the PCs will be spending quite some time there. The module comes fully and properly bookmarked for your convenience.

Brian Suskind and Ben McFarland are both adventure-veterans, and it really shows: This module is modular, non-linear in many aspects, and takes plenty of different PC capabilities into account. It rewards not slaying all foes, while still clearly painting a picture of the bad guys as forces that need to be stopped. Disease is a delicate subject matter, and as such, it is admirable how well the module manages to depict the material, and how it takes topics that would work just as well in a dark fantasy context and portray them as light-hearted. (As an aside: Yes, you can run this as anything ranging from light-hearted, as written, to rather dark – the latter only needs cosmetic reskins regarding the flavor and read-aloud text. I could see this work perfectly in e.g. Kobold Press’ Midgard…)

This adventurer is structurally easily one of the strongest offerings for newer groups, and it achieves its family-friendly tone, without compromising the excitement for veterans – in short, it must be hailed as a resounding success. The only reason this misses my seal of approval would be the absence of player-friendly maps, but this still comes wholeheartedly-recommended by yours truly, at a final verdict of 5 stars. Whether novice or veteran, this is definitely worth a trip!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Beginnings: Crisis at Falling Spring Station
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Legendary Cavaliers
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/22/2019 06:27:50

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This installment of Legendary Games‘ class rewrites clocks in at 42 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 32 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

We start this supplement with the break-down of the cavalier rewrite, and oh boy, does the class need one, so what does the Legendary Cavalier bring to the table? Well, chassis-wise, the class gets d10 HD, 4 + Int skills per modifier, proficiency with simple and martial weapons and all types or armor as well as shields, minus tower shields, and full BAB plus good Fort- and Will-saves. The class begins play with mount, which gets Light Armor Proficiency – but in an important caveat, it does treat Light Armor Proficiency as share spells, which will allow for plenty of companion modifications. It’s a small line, but an excellent one. Another small, but important caveat: The legendary cavalier’s mount, should the old one die, does gain the full ability array and is not basically nigh-useless until the next level attained, so yeah, the base mount ability has been improved. Additionally, the cavalier gets noble steed at first level, which translates to a +1 morale bonus on attack rolls with natural attacks at 1st level, which improves by another +1 at 5th level and every 4 levels thereafter. I like the higher level improvements, but I don’t think the 1st level bonus was required, considering how deadly the mount can already be at first level, but I digress. At 4th level, the mount may ignore difficult terrain while charging and being ridden and 10th level makes this always on while being ridden, not just when charging.

At 6th level, we get the means to treat the mount as smaller, making it more dungeon exploration-friendly (though ladders etc. still remain a problem). Still, kudos! 7th level nets DR 2/- to the mount while riding, which increases by 1 at 11th level and every 4 levels thereafter. Also at this level, we get a crucial ability: “Risky Lunge” – this allows for a move action to only be 5 ft. and count as a charge, but at -2 AC for cavalier and mount. This allows for some seriously wicked reach trickery and unlocks a whole new array of tactical builds that don’t require straight charging into the fray. 13th level makes the mount count as one size category larger for the purpose of natural weapon attacks, and this increase thankfully doesn’t scale with others. At 9th level, as long as the legendary cavalier is within 60 ft. of it and the mount is above 0 hit points, the cavalier gets Diehard and Deathless Initiate, regardless of prerequisites, which upgrades at 17th level to apply even if the cavalier would be dead! And yes, this allows for healing back up. Pretty awesome. Cavalier’s charge, mighty charge and supreme charge are retained, though the latter is moved down one level to 19th level.

12th level nets steed’s parry, which allows the cavalier to expend 2 rounds of commander’s aura as an immediate action to make a Ride check against the incoming attack roll, halving damage and applying it to the mount instead on a success. I usually cringe whenever I read “parry” in class abilities, as most mechanics are plain broken – this one works really well. What is the commander’s aura? I’m glad you asked!

The most obvious change of pace would be the commander’s aura, which may be maintained for 4 + Charisma modifier rounds per day, activated as a move action and maintained as a free action. Every level beyond 1st adds +2 rounds to the aura’s daily allotment. It has 9 different benefits, extends 60 feet (+20 feet at 5th level and every 4 levels thereafter) and is correctly codified regarding the types of effect it is treated as. The effects include scaling DR, fast healing, temporary hit points, AC and weapon damage boosts, energy resistance (sonic is an option!), CMB, movement and save bonuses. I LOVE this. Meaningful tactics and round-by-round agenda every single time. Plus, the cavalier is rewarded for not dumpstatting Charisma. (Oh and yeah, benefits may be switched as a swift action, starting at 7th as an immediate action.) This improvement alone makes the Legendary Cavalier already infinitely better than its regular iteration. This is further enhanced at 4th level, where the cavalier gets commander’s shout – this ability allows the cavalier to spend 4 rounds of the ability to grant an ally an additional move action on their turn, but an ally may only benefit from the like once per day, even from different legendary cavaliers (VERY important catch! Kudos!). 10th level nets the option to grant an additional standard action instead, though this can’t be used for spellcasting or SPs – until 16th level. 20th level nets a move and standard action that may be combined into a full-round action. Love it!

That’s not all! At 8th level, the cavalier gets chivalry’s call – a swift action shout that costs 3 rounds of the aura and affects a target in its range, allowing said target to reroll their Will-save, using the cavalier’s Will-save bonus if it’s higher. 10th level unlocks two of the aura benefits at once (no additional cost in rounds). 15th level allows the cavalier to select an ally to move up to their speed or make an attack when they reduce a target to 0 hp or below. And yes, this is bag of kittens proofed. At 18th level, the cavalier may spend 4 rounds of the aura while making an attack to prompt the target to require to save or be stunned for 1 round; additionally, thereafter, for Charisma modifier rounds, the target needs to save to continue attacking the cavalier.

Ähem, where was I? 1st level also nets order, but the engine has been revamped there as well – I’ll get to orders below. Banner is gained at 2nd level, and its improvements have been tweaked to apply on 10th and 18th level instead. Greater banner, at 14th level, has been tweaked – its primary save boost is retained, but instead of a reroll, we have Diehard for allies in range, which fits imho better. At 2nd level, the cavalier gets +1/2 class level to Diplomacy, and 5th level nets the skill unlock for Diplomacy. I know, right? It suddenly feels like you’re looking at a knight, not an armored and mounted murder-hobo! 3rd level nets renown, 8th level great renown and 14th level incredible renown. Minor nitpick – these are social talents, not vigilante talents. 5th level nets a social talent (erroneously called vigilante talent twice) from a list, and 11th and 17th level net another. The capstone, btw. – renown in massive, huge metropolis! (In addition to aforementioned abilities with a more combat-centric application.)

Pertaining orders: The pdf presents 11 orders, and they all have a signature skill. Every cavalier level, the cavalier gets a bonus skill rank and treat said skill as a class skill, with 8th level providing the skill unlock for the signature skill. Oh, and guess what? There is an option for being orderless! And another, important thing: Each order not only comes with a brief flavor text, it also provides a unique application of commander’s aura! The order of the beyond allows, for example, to treat all allied weapons as aligned! Ouch! Temporary skill grants, scaling DR-bypassing, quick and better Survival and Stealth, cavaliers taking ½ damage of allies, and what about allies preventing 5-foot steps and withdraw on a failed save? Better Stealth and demoralizing, etc. also can be found here. In short: The orders have been properly rewired to account for the vastly improved base class engine. Additionally, we get no less than 6 different favored class options for all races, allowing for +1 round, more mount hp, increased movement rate, darkvision, etc.. Liked these!

The class customization is not done! We can also choose two variant proficiency loadouts – one nets you, for example, tower shield proficiency in exchange for ranged martial proficiency, and another allows for exotic weapon use at 1st level. The dual aura ability may be exchanged with challenge if you really want that one back. Instead of the auras and dual aura, you can have weapon training – loss of these doesn’t render the ability useless, due to the follow up abilities. Reduced commander’s aura is also presented here (oddly, thrice – it’s literally the same text, three times. Weird cut copy paste glitch, but doesn’t hurt anyone.) Favored enemy is an option as well. Banner and greater banner may be exchanged for wild empathy, fast movement or fast rider. The renown/court angle may be exchanged for rogue talents, favored terrain or maneuver training; rider’s bond may be replaced with stalwart (not a fan) or uncanny dodge. The charge abilities (beyond the basics) may be exchanged for combat style or martial flexibility. So yeah, you can play brawling hedgeknight, criminal deserters, etc.

The pdf also comes with 11 archetypes: Draconic avenger nets you a drake companion mount (not to be used with Legendary Games’ Wyrmtouched without the feat-chain – kudos for accounting for that!), and the archetype loses the charge/risky lunge array. Dreadnaughts are pretty cool – the class loses the mount, but gets oversized weapons – two-handed weaponry one-handed at first level, intercepting movement, body checks and crashing into targets. This archetype makes you feel like a big, bad colossus dude – basically, the defensive tricks and the like of the mount are integrated into this guy. Really, really cool one, and a resounding success as far as I’m concerned. Firearm soldiers are a straight engine tweak – charges are replaced with a bit of firearm tricks. More interesting would be the houndsmaster, who gets a pair of dogs or wolfdogs that can share a space or “split”, basically tweaking the base companion engine to behave like a conglomerate “lite” version, a splittable entity. I love this. The hounds act as a mount stand-in and allow for some soft crowd control and tactics beyond the regular means that companions offer, and e.g. Combat Reflexes and similar tricks further emphasize this massive engine tweak in a compelling manner, which is particularly suited for darker fantasy games, as the hounds at higher levels can sever limbs when attacking in conjunction – and yep, we get a half-page table that notes the consequences. Minor nitpick: These rules should state loss of ring-benefits, for example, for arms lost, but that is evident from context.

The iron general would be a monk/brawler-like hybrid archetype for unarmed cavaliers. The jungle rider gets a modified proficiency list, can make crooked charges and delays the mount to 4th level, where he gets a more exotic array of creatures to choose from. Masked travelers are a tweak that emphasizes the vigilante-ish angle, losing banner etc. and locking the target into being order-less. Marrow lancers are basically the death knight angle – undead companion (more resilient, less agile), and a fully modified commander’s aura feature that focuses on debuffs, and a more nasty Intimidate focus make this one a great choice for anti-heroes and villains.

Mounted champions presented an interesting thing I seriously did not expect to see: Spheres of Might-synergy! Yep, Legendary Games and Drop Dead Studios synergy? Awesome! This fellow employs the Beastmastery and Warleader spheres, allowing for full Spheres of Might synergy. Nice! (Minor nitpick: The header for Mount (Ex) is not bolded.) The pegasus knight is straightforward, and nets you a neutral winged animal version of Pegasus. The steppe rider gets the chance to fire through wind walls, more mobile mounts (while in full movement), shots that hamper targets, Perception skill unlocks, severing arrows at higher levels – basically, think of these guys as the equivalent of the mighty Mongolian cavalry.

The pdf also includes a 6-level PrC, the lancer, who requires +5 BAB, Mounted Combat and Weapon Focus (lance), 2 skills at 5 ranks to take; the PrC gains ½ Fort-save progression, full BAB-progression, d10 HD, 2 + Int skills per level. Ultimately, this PrC represents a different take on the cavalier concept – namely that of the lance-wielding knight who gets elevated to his position. Renown and several cavalier-ish tricks are gained, emphasizing the journey to knighthood, if you will.

We also are introduced to 7 new feats: Aura Study nets you one additional aura you’d usually lose to reduced commander’s aura. Wait. What? Yep, this ties in, obviously, with the tripled reduced commander’s aura – it is evident that a variant that should provide less auras was intended to be one of the reduction options and got somewhat shafted by the glitch. If you really want a base order’s challenge, you can gain the like via a feat, and e.g. houndmaster can choose wolves. There also is a feat to gain an order’s aura, etc. The magic items section includes a banner enhancer, and weapon property that enhances the aura. Really cool: There is a gem that can be attuned to a companion allows you to bring an attuned companion back from the dead. A bridle that makes targets behave as combat trained can be found, and a saddle allows a critter to use the rider’s Will-save vs. mind-affecting effects. The shared pain saddle, finally, allows for 1/round transferral of pain to the mount, with HD as a cool scaling mechanism.

The book concludes with Arsa Verain, a CR 3 sample Legendary Cavalier, who comes with a detailed background story as well as his mount’s stats. His questing has a personal take – Arsa had feelings for a man called Jerome, who, alas, before Arsa could confess, was seemingly taken away by a mysterious woman – and so he looks for a lost love that may be not even reciprocal. He does come with full boon-notes. (I noticed a missing “l” at one point in the prose there.)

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are still very good as a whole; the book generally tackles complex concepts with pinpoint precision, avoiding the usual oversights we’ve come to dread. Anti-abuse caveats, smart notes on statting, ability classification – this gets almost all right…excluding the odd tripling glitch, which does negatively impact in a minor way one of the feats and some intended customization options. It’s not hard to salvage this, mind you, but it’s a bit of a downside. There are also slightly more typos/aesthetic formatting glitches here than usual for Legendary Games, though these still number less than in the vast majority of comparable publications. Layout adheres to the series’ two-column full-color standard, and the pdf features a variety of new and classic full-color artworks. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Sooo…the legendary cavalier’s base engine is a resounding frickin’ success of epic proportions. There. I said it. Sure, a couple of the archetypes are the obligatory engine tweaks, but we also get several intriguing and well-wrought complex options. The lancer realizes an alternate take on the concept, suitable for more historic/medieval-themed settings…but seriously, for me, the base class is the unmitigated star.

The vanilla cavalier had an identity crisis, was boring to play, did not have much customization options or agenda in combat. The Legendary cavalier is not the most customizable class ever – you can still hand this to a novice without much issue. However, the awesome aura-engine means that you have viable, interesting combat options. The departure from the challenge focus means that you don’t have to rest all the damn time for that one class feature…and I could go on. Is this formally perfect? Nope, and I do have to account for that.

More important, though: Does this finally do the cavalier justice? Make him a non-magic knight that is badass and cool to play? That does something else than charge every damn turn? Heck yeah. N. Jolly, Dave Nelson, Jason Nelson, Hal Kenette and Blake Morton rocked this class hardcore. I don’t even have to think for a second – this guy replaces all cavaliers in my games, and should be considered to be an EZG Essential for all games that feature the cavalier class. It’s a straight, vast improvement that finally makes the cavalier feel like it should be. My final verdict will clock in at 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5 (because the few glitches are excusable), and this gets my seal of approval. Make your cavaliers actually matter and be fun. Get this one!

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Legendary Cavaliers
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Malevolent Medium Monsters
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/05/2019 05:24:43

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This bestiary clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 2 pages of introduction/how to use, 1 page editorial, 1 page ToC, 1 page SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 20 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

Okay, let’s be real – ginormous monsters are awesome! Duking it out with Godzilla as a demigod-like high-level character? Heck yeah! Here’s the thing: Running these titanic foes on the battlemat? That can be a pain. Worse: What if you need a good showdown in the middle of a dungeon? Suddenly, the vast threat is a lot less mobile, cool, and you need to structure the dungeon to account for it. Retreating battles are out of the question…and I could go on.

This is where this book comes in – within its pages, we get an array of new Medium monsters for mid to high levels. Better yet – the creatures are new, and they all come with their own full-color artworks. Beyond that, they not only feature unique signature abilities, they also come with full write-ups for their ecology as well as habitat & society! These are not just bland statblocks, they have a context. I thoroughly applaud this!

But what kind of monsters do we get within? Well, first, there would be the alabaster beetle, and I love it: This CR 12 vermin has a carapace that renders them invisible to darkvision (Now that’ll be a nasty surprise!) and they also are capable of emitting a spray of acidic, paralytic spray with a cooldown. Add grab and constrict, and we have a critter that feels plausible in its streamlined nature, and creative. Strong first critter!

The homunculus dragon (CR 16) has easily my favorite artwork within this book: They have blood points that they can use to metamagically enhance their spells, and the draconic patchwork creature has a chaotic breath weapon – it may manifest as cones or lines, and damage types similarly are random…oh, and the length? It also oscillates! Cool! The homunculus dragon can also generate a random elemental aura, and with its clever feat array, it makes for a kickass adversary!

Taking a truly horrifying concept, we also are introduced to a new construct, the CR 14 Ersatz (which btw. means “replacement” in German); an ersatz comes with programmed skills, depending on the role it’s supposed to take, and they are superb at imitating the creature they’re designed to mimic. Its disguise only becomes flawed once it has taken a sufficient amount of damage…oh, and guess what…they have a self-repairing trance. Being actually composed of a bloodlike matter, they can bypass armor and shield bonuses by worn equipment, but not their enhancement bonuses. Oh, and yes, construction notes included. Basically, we have liquid replicant blood-terminators. How cool is that???

At CR 15, the faithslain are undead wearing porcelain mask, a darkened void behind the eye-slots, a slithering, black tongue that deals negative energy damage (or heals undead) projecting from the mouth. Creeped out yet? They are vulnerable to good magic…but its tongue? It may instill heretical thoughts in those hit, tainting the target. Really nasty and creepy – as undead should be. The write-up also btw. includes a good version

Then, we get general rules for fiendfused creatures, which are a kind of extremely possessed humanoid: They all can change shape, and gain fiendish knowledge. Sufficient damage from [good] spells or holy weapons (not italicized; like a couple of other spell-references here) can actually rip free the fiend, annihilating the fiendfused, but confronting the PCs with a well-rested and angry fiend… and while fiendfused have the monstrous humanoid type, they detect as outsiders, but do NOT count as such for the purpose of effects that inflict additional damage versus fiendfused.

There are a total of 4 fully-statted fiendfused included: The first, at CR 18, would be the Abyssal tyrant, who is a fusion of humanoid and balors that is wreathed in a nimbus of “unholy damage”-causing energy. There is no such thing in PFRPG. Cool, on the other hand: On crits, these fellows can snare targets in bonds of force, and they get a backlash versus targets that crit them – oddly, here they get the damage type right…but on a flavor nitpick, the ability shouldn’t be called “Hellfire Rebuke” – balors are demons, not devils. While I’m nitpicking: The magic weapons the creature uses are not properly italicized, a minor oversight that also extends to the CR 15 coil kissed fiendfused. These fellows add 1.5 Strength bonus to damage with slams (Strength not properly capitalized), their weapons become magical, and they have an increased slam reach. Their grapples are weird, though; or at least: Inconvenient. One ability kicks in when the fiendfused hits two or more times with a slam, but the standard attack array only sports one slam; an alternate, weapon-less attack array would have made this more convenient to use.

On the lawful evil side of things, we also get CR 18 infernal despots, pit fiends fused with mortals. These fellows can grapple foes with their tails, get poisonous pins, and immediate action quickened fireball retribution for crits is neat, as is the ability to tear the DR-ignoring properties of defensive tricks of armor etc. away. Nasty, brutal – love ‘em! The final fiendfused is the fellow we can see on the cover – at CR 11, we have the shearing menace, a fusion of mortal and glabrezu, who gets an alternate attack that can neuter the movement rates of targets, confuse targets subject to rend, and 1/day retaliate for a crit with power word: stun.

Finally, there would be an aberration – the CR 18 misbirthed, a thing straight out of your Silent Hill-ish nightmares, with not only a nasty SP-array, but beyond that, even looking at it may render you insane, as per insanity! And yes, the ability does still affect those immune to fear, though to a lesser extent. Sure, it only is this bad when seen in proper light…but here’s the issue: Proper lighting is the only thing that can suspend the creature’s regeneration…and no, daylight does not suffice. In darkness or other lighting conditions, on the other hand, the misbirthed warps reality and may attack multiple targets…Creatures successfully subjected to the misbirthed’s rend attack have a chance to be randomly greater teleport/plane shift-ed away. Truly a horrifying monster! To quote the flavor text: “Bruised and red skin stretch over a malformed alien skeleton. It’s impossible to tell what parts are bone or what parts are flesh, amid the body of the writhing creature. This thing should not exist.”

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are, for the most part, very good on both a rules-language and formal level; it’s just in the fiendfused that sport a couple of minor hiccups, two of which, unfortunately, slightly influence rules-integrity on a rules-language level; on a formal level, there are a few missed italicizations, more than I’m accustomed to see from Legendary Games. Layout adheres to the two-column full-color standard of the Wrath of the Righteous plugins, and the plethora of full-color artworks provided for the monsters is cool. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Thurston Hillman and Jesse Bonner provide a great array of flavorful, high-concept critters – quality over quantity. Much to my pleasant surprise, even the fiendfused aren’t just straight ability-grafts, but do creative things. On a metalevel, I really love how they have abilities that discourage builds that focus solely on critical hits, and how it doesn’t go the easy route – these are high-complexity, well-written adversaries, which makes up for some of the minor, formal snafus. There is not a single creature herein that I disliked or considered boring – and it’s only the minor hiccups that make me omit my seal of approval from this pdf, which makes this clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Malevolent Medium Monsters
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The Horseshoe Calamity
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/21/2019 05:06:09

An Endzeitgeist.com review

This adventure clocks in at 28 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page inside of front cover, 1 page editorial, 2 pages of introduction, 1 page ToC, 2 pages of SRD, 1 page advertisement, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 18 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

As always: It should be noted that I am working for Legendary Games as developer; I have received this module and the request to review it prior to taking this position, and hereby vow I’ll rate it to the best of my abilities in a neutral manner.

This adventure can be used as a stand-alone adventure, or it can be used to complement the third part of the Reign of Winter AP, “Maiden, mother, Crone.” It is intended for 7th level characters, and begins in the small town of Dolanni, inhabited by the semi-nomadic Ovoskich tribe.

The village comes with proper settlement statblock, as well as an impressive full-color map of it and its surroundings. Even better, the pdf does come with a proper, player-friendly, key-less version. Kudos! The dungeon map btw. also comes with a player-friendly version – cartographer Marco Morte did a great job here as well. The pdf contains a magic item that is a special reed – when it’s consumed, the character gets to instantly reassign a language known. There is also a magic axe contained herein that may change its damage type for cold, and a new monster at CR 8 is also included inside.

This being an adventure-review, the following contains SPOILERS. Potential players should jump ahead to the conclusion. … .. . All right, only GMs around? Great! So, as the PCs approach the settlement, they’ll meet a welcome committee of the most unusual kind – you see, half the populace there actually consists of centaurs. Why? Well, you see, there was a tomb unearthed, and in the tried and true tradition of foolhardy folks, a magic horseshoe was taken – and now, racial tensions are rising: As blackened ghosts (Specters) are rising from the disturbed tomb, humans blame the centaurs for not returning the horseshoe, while the centaurs consider the humans reticence to fight cowardly. Both sides have suffered losses at this point, and it’s only a matter of time before things escalate.

The first component of the module is about deescalating the racial tensions – which, while optional and good in the long run, will pit the PCs against a hothead centaur hunter, potentially has the PCs partake in aforementioned reed, and face down the inevitable specter attack. The second part of the adventure has the PCs explore the tomb that the scout Alasha plundered by kinda-accident, facing the new monster, the hoofghast (basically an undead centaur that heals in cold temperatures and has a concentration/Int-based skill/ability-impeding aura) and also a dread frost wight cleric of Kostchtchie, which can provide hints/an optional tie-in with the big AP-module. Rewards for the winged horseshoes and rewards are appropriate.

Conclusion: Editing and formatting are very good on a formal and rules-language level, though there are a few instances where magic item references aren’t italicized. Layout adheres to the neat two-column full-color standard of the Reign of Winter-plugins, and the pdf sports several really nice, original full-color artworks I haven’t seen before. The cartography, as noted, is amazing, with full player-friendly map support. The pdf comes fully bookmarked for your convenience.

Ron Lundeen’s “Horseshoe Calamity” can help provide a more organic introduction into the statues-dungeon of the AP, and it makes for a nice chance to roleplay. It is, in short, a nice sidetrek with excellent production values. While its brevity means that it’s not exactly the most complex of narratives, it doesn’t have to be. All in all, this is a nice little addition to the AP. My final verdict will clock in at 4 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Horseshoe Calamity
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